Antifreeze - not just for cars

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I do remember. There may be horizontal runs of pipe which still contain water.
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Yeah, but they won't be FILLED with water, like when they were under pressure.

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I hope that you're right. Depends on how much slope, and in which direction.
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What other option is there? NOT draining the pipes?

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1) do nothing 2) gravity drain (been done) 3) blow out with compressed air 4) pump some antifreeze into the water lines, some how 5) power back on, or some form of heat source 6) leave water dribbling
Maybe I missed one?
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Gravity drain is free and easy, and requires no other equipment other than a beer, which you enjoy while standing there saying "Yep. It's draining."

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On Thu, 10 Dec 2009 13:29:56 -0500, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Don't count on it doing a complete enough job to prevent damage from a freeze-up. There are many reasons why portions of plumbing may not drain unless the lines are blown out with compressed air.
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That's my concern. Might be horizontal pipes with sags.
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On Thu, 10 Dec 2009 15:36:13 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"
A 1/2 inch pipe that is run more or less horizontal but is 3/4 inch higher at one end than the other is enough to cause a disaster.
Now think about how easy it would be for that condition to exist!
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It's an older house, probably 30 plus years old. VERY easy to have saggy horizontals.
Is it (typically) easier to pour antifreeze into the pipes, or blow the water out?
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Only if the water supply enters the house above all the other pipes, which is an arrangement I don't think is very common on this planet. Now, if you change the word "pour" to "pump", you may have a chance of this discussion ending before a week from next Tuesday.
wrote:

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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

huh? for most of the houses in az, the water supply enters about 3' up an outside wall, and all pipes are below the slab except for stubs coming up where there is a valve.

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So, pouring would get the anti-freeze to the 2nd floor. Right?
Yes?
Base your response ONLY on the word "pouring".
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The house in question is in NY. Water supply comes through the floor, and goes up from there.
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How many lungs full of air would it take to blow the antifreeze into the pipes? Let's get all mathy.

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I doubt human lung power would do the job. A pump top garden sprayer, and some duct tape, and the end off a garden hose, maybe. And a couple hose clamps.
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I figured there had to be some way to use a garden sprayer, and adapt it some how, to a garden hose. Maybe a lot of duct tape, and a couple hose clamps. Use that to pump antifreeze into the water lines.
Of course, when the house is reoccupied, they would have to flush a bunch of water through the lines, to clear the antifreeze.
The water inlet is through the cellar floor.
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On Thu, 10 Dec 2009 17:09:38 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Pouring antifreeze into the pipes would have the same problem as trying to use gravity alone to drain them.
So, do you want easy that doesn't work? In that case, why bother doing anything? Doing nothing would be even easier, and just as effective!
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Me smells a troll ..........
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On Thu, 10 Dec 2009 15:36:13 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"
As long as the low parts are not more than half filled with water they are unlikely to burst. Same goes with traps. If there is only enough water to half fill the bottom of the trap, they usually won't split.
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