Another Welding Question

I read the "I want to weldnow what" thread and it got me to thinking about a project I need to work on.
I'm restoring an old Victorian house. Back then there were several plumbing fixture manufactures but there were no standards. They all used there own thread sizes so you would have to come back to them for parts. I've bought some vintage faucets but none of the threads are inch or inch or anything like that. My thought was to cut the threads off the old faucets and weld on threads from a modern faucet. I'm talking about the threads that are under the sink were the supply line screws on. Neither the threads or the weld will be visible above the sink.
The threaded part is roughly 3 inches long. The faucets are nickel plated brass. One is solid nickel. I'm wondering if the heat of the weld will tarnish or discolor the nickel plating. The weld would be about an inch and a half from the visible nickel plating.
Also, what would be the best way to weld brass. I have access to oxy-acetylene and an arc welder at work. I took welding in shop during high school so I have some experience but I am a novice. The welds will not have to support much at all.
Any thoughts?
Greg
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The heat of welding, brazing, etc will destroy any fancy finishes. Take the faucet to any good machine shop. They should be able to make a custom coupling for you from brass (?) that could thread onto your original and receive a short section of the new.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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I agree with this. His other option would be to use some JB Weld. That stuff is strong.
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Greg DeBacker wrote:

Can you tap internal threads; maybe 1/4" NPT, and screw in a brass close nipple?

Oxy-propane or oxy-acetylene with a very small tip. Maybe a 000 welding tip. Use silver solder with a high silver content, and use lots of flux.

I think it's basicly a bad idea, but the worst that will happen is you ruin the fixtures. You can polish the nickel finish if it discolors, assuming it really is nickel and is not laquered.
Wrap the upper part of the faucet with a wet cloth to protect it a little from overheating.
Best regards, Bob
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Thanks for the feedback. I didn't expect any glowing recomendations on this idea but you've got to start somewhere. One of the sets of faucets are not in the best of shape, so if I do try this I will start with them. They have been cleaned so many times the nickel plating has worn away in places. The 1887 set are solid nickel and pretty cool. I would hate to ruin those. Having a machine shop tap (or is it die?) new threads is a good idea. I hadn't thought of that.
Greg
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I had a friend restore an old wood cook stove, and he had all the metal parts and bolts nickel plated. The stove looked great, till he left it outside in the rain (while waiting for the cottage to be finished)...anyways, it tarnished the finish, but can't remember if he was able to polish it back. The reason for all this is to let you know you can get things nickel plated.

flux.
ruin
assuming
little
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Thanks for the info. What I've learned from doing restoration on this 1895 Victorian is that if you have the moeny you can get ANYTHING done. The faucets are a small part of a very large project. For people like me (non-millionairs), the least expensive way is often the best when it comes to non-structual things. I really do appriciate the help, though.
Greg
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