Another tiling question


I am in the throes of tiling the walls in the bathroom - all of them. I am using tiles that are almost 2' X 1' (metric equivalent).
Anyhow it works out that the bottom tile is approx 1/2" from the floor tile. I sort of like the idea of not having a baseboard, but having tile right to tile. Ideally the gap would have been smaller, but that is how it all worked out, not having a tile stretcher handy.
I was wondering if anyone has suggestions:
- fill it with grout? - is there some other material commonly used for that purpose? - slice a little piece of tile to fit ( probably look stupid) - forget it and cut each and every tile to make them shorter and insert a baseboard and all that entails?
Any ideas from people who may do this all the time is appreciated. Obviously I do it once every 20 years unless I can possibly avoid it....
BSA
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

grout it with sanded grout. fill it with a small trim tile in a contrasting color. i've used 1/4 round tiles at edges and on the floor/wall interface for this.
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On Mon, 29 Mar 2010 15:54:38 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com"

Start with half a tile. You'll have a half tile + 1/2" at the top.

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On Mar 29, 7:59 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

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Put the gap at the ceiling and hide with some tiny trim. It will be much less likely to leak water if the gap is up rather than down.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I don't do it for a living and I have no suggestions for your current dilemma but next time you do it plan your layout properly so you don't have that problem. You do that by dividing the space to be tiled into quadrants and by starting your tiles at the center in a manner that will give you the largest possible cut tiles at the perimeters.
--

dadiOH
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Sometimes. Sometimes with that method you end up with small and unsightly cuts on both sides of a window, or in the corners, but your point is valid.
As tile gets larger layout becomes more critical for a professional looking job. As the job ventures beyond the typical '3 walls over the tub' it gets even more complicated.
If you want a sharp tile-to-tile floor/wall corner you need a floor not much more out of level than the thickness of the floor tile and you tile the walls to the (high) level line first.
It never ceases to amaze me to see commercial jobs where there's a whole tile in the back corner and the cuts are on prominent display. Probably so common these days nobody other than old tile men notice. -----
- gpsman
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