Another Space Heater Question - Oil Filled

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wrote:

I have a very old, high powered floor fan that has a hard time getting started. It spins freely when spun by hand, but often - not always - needs a little nudge to get running at full speed. It starts, but it turns really slow until I nudge the blade.
As I said, with the motor off it spins freely, so I don't think it's a bearing issue in my case.
Once it's up to speed it can dry a pair of newly washed pair of jeans in less than a hour. It swivels from 45 degrees downward to 180 degrees up. We often put it under the clothesline in the basement, point it straight up and dry clothes that we need quickly but don't want to put in the dryer.
There's no safety screen and I imagine that at top speed it would do some serious damage to a body part.
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On 11/28/2012 1:25 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Does the fan motor have a hump on it with a capacitor inside it? If so, the capacitor may be in need of replacement and it's not expensive. ^_^
TDD
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On Wed, 28 Nov 2012 13:32:47 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Most likely a "shaded pole" motor of some sort. Very low starting torque - and generally impedence protected so it won't seriously overheat if running in slip for a prolonged period.
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On 11/28/2012 9:21 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

A lot of ceiling fans I've worked on have small run capacitors. ^_^
TDD
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Bad run capacitor, most likely.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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I have a very old, high powered floor fan that has a hard time getting started. It spins freely when spun by hand, but often - not always - needs a little nudge to get running at full speed. It starts, but it turns really slow until I nudge the blade.
As I said, with the motor off it spins freely, so I don't think it's a bearing issue in my case.
Once it's up to speed it can dry a pair of newly washed pair of jeans in less than a hour. It swivels from 45 degrees downward to 180 degrees up. We often put it under the clothesline in the basement, point it straight up and dry clothes that we need quickly but don't want to put in the dryer.
There's no safety screen and I imagine that at top speed it would do some serious damage to a body part.
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On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 22:39:25 -0800, Jon Danniken

In many cases they are DESIGNED to start slowly rather than blowing COLD air around. Generally they are an impedence protected shaded pole motor with not enough starting torque to pull the blade up to speed quickly - particularly if the voltage is reduced due to the heavy current draw of the cold heater.
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On 11/27/2012 10:08 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

[snip]
I used to know someone who had a heat pump with backup heat like that. It meant really high electric bills in the winter.

I have seem the opposite, 240V outlet connected as 2 circuits to Christmas lights. I might have had to do that if I hadn't changed to mostly LED lights.

--
26 days until the winter celebration (Tue Dec 25, 2012 12:00:00 AM for 1
day).

Mark Lloyd
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My heat pump has 10 kw of electric heat. As this is in the middle of North Carolina I doubt it has ever came on. Atleast in the 6 years that I have had it the electric bill seems normal. Not too much differance in the winter heating or summer AC. There is a reasonable drop for a couple of months when it is not too hot or cold.
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On 11/29/2012 4:45 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

If you have a super insulated home, you could heat it with a candle. ^_^
TDD
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I have made temp measurement on three levels on mine. High is well over 200 degrees. Low, something like 160 degrees in room temperature. I keep them far enough away from walls.
Greg
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On 11/27/2012 05:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The ones I have disassembled have a thermal fuse inside, at least one of which was of the non-resetting type (I know this because I actually had to replace that one).
Jon
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Well, 15 KW should be the same. The warm room application would get hotter oil temps.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Picture an oil filled space heater no thermostat switched to the 15KW setting.
Picture it in a closed room with no thermostat in a house that is kept at 68 F by a thermostat in another room. Assume that the heat from the space heater does not reach the thermostat.
Now picture the space heater sitting outside on a 35 F day.
Does it use the same amount of electricity in both situations?
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