Another Space Heater Question - Oil Filled

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Picture an oil filled space heater no thermostat switched to the 15KW setting.
Picture it in a closed room with no thermostat in a house that is kept at 68 F by a thermostat in another room. Assume that the heat from the space heater does not reach the thermostat.
Now picture the space heater sitting outside on a 35 F day.
Does it use the same amount of electricity in both situations?
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yes, since in both cases it runs full on
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Might be a small increase in the power to the colder unit, because of a slight decrease in heater element resistance.
Greg
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while the cold electrical heaters resistance is a bit lower at start up, so a small increase in heat, but this only lasts for seconds at most. till the resistance wire is hot.
so the overall power consumption is basically the same,,,,,, a insignifacant difference
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On 11/27/2012 7:22 PM, bob haller wrote:

The point of oil filled heaters is that the oil transfers the heat to a large surface area. The large surface area is at a lower temperature to transfer the same heat as the small surface area of just a resistance element. The heating element does not get as hot in the oil filled heater. I agree with gregz.
For electric baseboard heaters, in general the NEC does not allow receptacles in the wall above the heater because of the high temperature of the heating element. Oil filled baseboards run at a lower temperature and a receptacle above the heater is likely allowed.

And I agree with gregz that it is a slight increase. Essentially insignificant.
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*It's 15kw inside and 15kw outside.
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15kw = 15000 watts ---- that is one massive portable heater, should get the oil boiling in short order.
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On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 13:40:25 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

I think you meant 1.5 KW or 1500 watts.
Assuming the heater is "on" all the time, yes. If, however, the closed room eventually heats up and shuts off the heater, it will stop using power. Heat generated by it will also escape the room and migrate to the rest of the house and lower the consumption of that fuel.
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On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 13:40:25 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

filled or not, could soon become dangerously overheated. The oil filled units HAVE an internal non-adjustable thermostat that limits the temperature to a safe level.
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On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 20:57:31 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

filled space heater.
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On 11/27/2012 8:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Perhaps there are some industrial units that big for some sort of heat curing or drying process? I could see a 15kw oil filled heater in an environmental test chamber for various items. ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

Or you could just get ten 1.5 kW units.... :)
--
EA


>
> TDD
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 11/27/2012 9:42 PM, Existential Angst wrote:

15kw electric heat is not unusual to add to a central AC system if there is no NG or propane available for a furnace but it runs on 240 volts ac. You won't be able to use that Christmas tree light extension cord. O_o
TDD
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You would need a big breaker. I have a 4500 watt garage heater on a 30 amp breaker. I don't know, but every fan blown heater i use starts out blowing real slow, then speeds up.
Greg
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On 11/27/2012 10:40 PM, gregz wrote:

We've actually sort of teasing Derby Dad because he wrote about a 15kw oil heater when I really believe he meant to write 1.5kw oil heater. ^_^
TDD
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On Nov 28, 12:57am, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-du...@stinky- finger.net> wrote:

...and I accept the teasing as deserved.
I orginally typed 1500W, then edited it to make it shorter (15KW) when in reality 1.5KW has the same number of characters as 1500W, so I was just wasting time anyway.
Regardless, I got the answer that I expected, along with some extra added info, also as expected, especially from this group.
Thanks!
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On 11/28/2012 1:06 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Sorry, I couldn't help it. Like I told a fellow, if I didn't like you, I wouldn't tease you. ^_^
TDD
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And how much quoted text?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 11/28/2012 1:06 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Sorry, I couldn't help it. Like I told a fellow, if I didn't like you, I wouldn't tease you. ^_^
TDD
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57 lines of quoted text, to tell us you were trying to backspace, and save two typed characters? I think your sense of proportion needs a bit of thought.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:18> 19> >>>>>>> Picture an oil filled space heater no thermostat switched to the 15KW 20> >>>>>>> setting.21> 22> >>>>>>> Picture it in a closed room with no thermostat in a house that is kept 23> >>>>>>> at 68 F by a thermostat in another room. Assume that the heat from the 24> >>>>>>> space heater does not reach the thermostat.25> 26> >>>>>>> Now picture the space heater sitting outside on a 35 F day.27> 28> >>>>>>> Does it use the same amount of electricity in both situations? 29> >>>>>> Yes - IF the heater has no thermostat - BUT, a 1500 watt heater, oil 30> >>>>>> filled or not, could soon become dangerously overheated. The oil 31> >>>>>> filled units HAVE an internal non-adjustable thermostat that limits 32> >>>>>> the temperature to a safe level. 33> >>>>> and a 15000 watt unit even MORE dangerous - if it existed as an oil 34> >>>>> filled space heater.35> 36> >>>> Perhaps there are some industrial units that big for some sort of heat 37> >>>> curing or drying process? I could see a 15kw oil filled heater in an 38> >>>> environmental test chamber for various items. ^_^39> 40> >>> Or you could just get ten 1.5 kW units.... :)41> 42> >> 15kw electric heat is not unusual to add to a central AC system if there 43> >> is no NG or propane available for a furnace but it runs on 240 volts ac. 44> >> You won't be able to use that Christmas tree light extension cord. O_o 45> 46> >> TDD47> 48> > You would need a big breaker. I have a 4500 watt garage heater on a 30 amp 49> > breaker. I don't know, but every fan blown heater i use starts out blowing 50> > real slow, then speeds up.51> 52> > Greg53> 54> We've actually sort of teasing Derby Dad because he wrote about a 15kw 55> oil heater when I really believe he meant to write 1.5kw oil heater. ^_^56> 57> TDD- ...and I accept the teasing as deserved.
I orginally typed 1500W, then edited it to make it shorter (15KW) when in reality 1.5KW has the same number of characters as 1500W, so I was just wasting time anyway.
Regardless, I got the answer that I expected, along with some extra added info, also as expected, especially from this group.
Thanks!
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On 11/27/2012 08:40 PM, gregz wrote:

Sounds like the bearings are sticky, causing friction,, and the heat caused by the rotor turning at less than full speed is heating them up until they are fluid enough to permit the shaft to turn with less resistance.
If you turn the rotor by hand, does it turn easily, and continue spinning after you take your hand away?
Jon
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