Another Question on Laminate Flooring


I just spent quite a bit of time researching Pergo.
Many have commented that there is a clicking sound when walking on it, and others have said it is too spongy.
Can anyone comment on this please?
Thanks.
Kate
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Spongy is usually a sloppy install or uneven floor. Clicking may be possible as it is a hard surface material and the right type of shoe material can make noise on any floor.
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I have none of those issues, being a bit soft is a bonus to keep from getting sore feet compared to walking on tile all day. But I will say maple pergo I have is so smooth any dirt shows immediatly and I have a few holes from dropping things in the kitchen. There are tougher floors that show less dirt.
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Kate wrote:

The floor itself doesn't "click" (or shouldn't). Perhaps commentators are hearing the taps on ladies' high heels?
Spongy? Could be. Laminate is not attached to the substance beneath it (i.e., concrete slab). If there are irregularities, such as laying laminate over carpeting, you might get a bounce or a wiggle. But put down even semi-properly, you won't see any bobbing.
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mop it up with Bruce laminate cleaner once a month, and I use a Swiffer once a month. Takes no time for 5 rooms. No dents in mine after 2 years, the usual water spills have caused zero problems; if a water ring is left behind, I use a lightly moistened paper towel and it's gone. Mine is Pergo on moisture barrier on concrete. Installed by Lowe's contracted personnel. hth
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Thank you Shelly. This is what I was looking for.
Shelly wrote:

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Kate wrote:

when I was house shopping 3 years ago, I didn't care for it. I detest fake woodgrain, and the floors looked and felt like a giant countertop to me. Wood is supposed to feel solid underfoot. The only engineered floors I would even consider are the ones with a real wood top layer, and them only if I couldn't afford 3/4 t&g hardwood. If that wasn't in the budget I'd go with good vinyl for wet rooms, and the most indestructible w/w carpet I could afford in the others.
But that is just me- YMMV, and probably will. I know plenty of people that love their fake floors.
-- aem sends...
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I know what you are talking about. The only reason I am looking at Pergo is that my brother has a high-end home and he has the real Mc coy wooden floors.
Accidents happen, and his refrigerator leaked. It was a mess, as he had to hire someone to come in and sand and treat the wood floor. He said if he had to do it over, he would go with a laminate floor.
Thank you for your feedback.
Kate
aemeijers wrote:

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Kate wrote:

I know someome who had to replace part of a floor when a dishwasher leaked. Google is your friend. Have you tried it?
Lou
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I'd also consider re-sale value. I'm not saying there aren't places and uses for Pergo that make sense. But I would question the judgement of someone who has a "high end home", telling you they would have preferred to have used Pergo flooring. I've never seen a high end home with Pergo.
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LouB wrote:

Some laminate is virtually impervious to water.
I took a strip and soaked it in a glass of tap water for a MONTH. Using a micrometer, there was swelling of about 2% compared to the original, no de-lamination, no detectable problem.
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HeyBub wrote:

Curious. Brand?
Lou
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LouB wrote:

Here ya go. I used the cheapest I could find - $0.78/sq ft.
http://www.lumberliquidators.com/catalog/thumbnail.jsp?categoryId &sectionId=4&subCategoryId(9&ref=By%20Category;274500016,By%20SubCategory;274600101
We also tried abusing the stuff: attacked it with a nail and wood rasp. No damage. They should make bullet-proof vests out of this stuff.
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HeyBub wrote:

Might not be a valid test in my opinion. What *shows* is swelling at the seams relative to the area away from the seams. You won't see that by submerging an entire piece.
I have several pieces in the middle of my family room where the edges near the seams have raised ever so slightly (never even had a spill there that I'm aware of) and when the light catches that spot it looks like crap.
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If he'd had laminate, then he'd be replacing the floor. Also, the "real Mc coy" is $3.79 a square foot at Lowe's, and $3 or less from the discount places. How exactly is that "high-end"?
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