Another pressure tank question

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39 or 38

If the gauge is reading 52 when it's open to the atmosphere, it's OBVIOUSLY defective.
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dpb wrote:

City water pressure is commonly 70 psi without regulators and isn't an issue for household fixtures. People moving to rural areas from cities often don't like the normal lower operating pressures of a well system and may increase the pressure range a bit. Ex-city folks may be much happier with 50-70 than 40-60, I had to do this for a friend who oddly enough had a low yield well and 1,500 gal cistern. We looked up the specs on the pump from the cistern and the pressure tank, the pump was rated up to 75 psi, and the tank was large enough that the 10 psi increase didn't have a significant effect on the drawdown. There isn't anything wrong with this as long as the pressure stays within the pump's ratings and there is adequate tank capacity to allow normal cycle intervals. A second pressure tank can be added if the existing one is too small.
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On 08/03/2014 5:48 PM, Pete C. wrote: ...

Mayhaps I've just been unlucky but in the 30 yrs we were on municipal water systems in VA and TN I regularly had particularly toilet valves fail until putting in PRVs. That encompasses 4 houses in Lynchburg, VA, (3 rentals and one owned). We were at one of the rentals long enough it kept failing valves until I finally put in the PRV on my own as being less of a pita.
I really notice very little difference at 20-40 in just routine operation but I'm pretty much an old-style, nothing new under the sun kinda' guy w/ no fancy gadgets. As noted above, however, we run a _LOT_ of stuff off the system handling up to 1500 head of cattle which uses a bunch of water on a 100F KS summer day...
--


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dpb wrote:

Showers are where the city folks get upset. Boosting the pressure works better than drilling / removing flow restrictors. Also some water fed appliances don't work quite right at lower pressures.
As for toilet valves and the like, I'd suspect it wasn't so much the lack of a regulator, but rather the lack of an expansion tank that caused your issues. Water meters typically have check valves, and if you don't have an expansion tank the pressures in your system can spike a lot higher than city pressure if you use a bunch of hot water and then the heater refills with cold, heats it and it expands. A small expansion tank can be had at 'Depot, Lowe's, etc. for $50 or so and can be installed at any convenient point in the system.
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so, one would not want to turn an adjustment screw, but they wouldn't mind changing the entire pressure switch? sounds like a professional to me - a professional who would be able to retire early.
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On Tuesday, August 5, 2014 9:13:32 AM UTC-7, Pico Rico wrote:









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I thought of that afterward. The answer is to do as I did last time I had to change mine. I wired it in with a length of romex (could have used exte nsion cord) on a plug so I didn't have to screw with the hardwire problem. I have to occasionally pull the switch to clean out the riser pipe.
Harry K
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it also seems to be more work than just doing it right.
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On Wednesday, August 6, 2014 8:27:38 AM UTC-7, Pico Rico wrote:



Really? Uplug, unscrew the switch do whatever and then reverse the procedure.
Pull cover, remove three leads from terminals. Now work the whire that is in conduit through that 90" el. on side of the switch...
I'll call you next time it needs doing and you can demonstrate.
Harry K
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On Wednesday, August 6, 2014 11:59:04 AM UTC-7, Harry K wrote:
Oops forgot to explain why I didn't just undo the conduit inside the box. That was the main reason I changed it. that fitting was one I had never se en before. It came down right angle into the box with one of those access covers used to work the wires around the 90 degree. The fastener in the box was a male that screwed into a female on the fitting. Fit almost flush and had two little 'tits' to use a screwdriver on. One was busted, the other i n a position I couldn't get at. I finally just cut the conduit and wire, re moved the switch and put it on a plug.
Then there is the problem that all that screwing around is done on the knee s and at 80 that is not a position I like. No more knee work for me on tha t problem.
Harry K
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yeah, that won't be necessary. I just do it the right way and don't have to worry about a bunch of dangling wires. But I think you were arguing with me agreeing with you (not sure).
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