Another 'multi-tool' question

Only this one is dumb. I have a garage full of tools, some I bought as far back as 50 years ago.
When I have seen the threads on here about 'multi-function' tools, I rather figured you were talking about like a pair of pliers with a screw driver on one leg of the grip.
You know, something like a Swiss Army knife - one tool with lots of gadgets. I never thought much of these sort of things, and steered away from them, so I didn't pay much attention to these multi-tool threads.
But, after reading a few, I have determined that this old man doesn't know as much as he thought he did. So my question is:
What the heck is a 'multi-tool'?
Thanks for setting me straight.
Bob-tx
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Look it it up on www.harborfreight.com. Click on 'Buy Now'. You'll be glad you did. You're welcome.
Joe
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Yea, except DO NOT buy it from Harbor Freight. All I have seen on this newsgroup is people having problems with them, particularly the blades breaking or getting chewed up quickly. And it now appears that you have to get replacements ONLY from HF.
Of course, anyone who knows anything about tools, dont buy them at HF anyhow. Pay more, get a name brand, and get something that will last and has blades available at the local hardware store.
HF sells garbage. Rather than waste the gas to drive to HF, just flush the money you planned to spend at HF down the toilet, and save the gasoline.
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snipped-for-privacy@someplace.com wrote:
-snip-

What???? I saw enough positives on the HF version here I went out and bought one to throw in a tool box in case I ever found a use for it. I've found several uses and think it is one of the better $40 I've spent on tools.

HF *is* a local store for me. Spend all you want on tools. I'd rather buy good bourbon if a HF tool can do the same job its expensive cousins can.

There is certainly garbage there--- but I have a growing collection of HF tools that are 'good enough'.
Jim
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snipped-for-privacy@someplace.com wrote:

You must be Lexdyksic.
1. There have been NO reports of HF tool failure on this newsgroup. If I'm wrong, please re-post the complaint.
2. The ONE instance of reported blade breaking involved another brand. Here's the post from Mike D on November 29th.
"Ok, so I bought one at Sutherlands, an off brand, but better than HF quality, Genesis brand. I replaced 1 window and the blade shattered. I went to the Borg and they said I need to buy the brand-specific blade. Aren't they interchangable?"
3. Your claim of blade uniqueness is patently false. I have used (and reported here) Dremel blades in my HF Twitching Tool. Others have reported using blades from both Bosch and Fein (that I recall). Still others have reported using HF blades in their Dremel and Fein.
4. The ONE recent report of "blades getting chewed up quickly" came from a user removing caulking from a brick wall. As I recall, his was an observation, not a complaint. Bricks WILL dull a blade quickly. Any blade.
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On Dec 1, 12:59am, snipped-for-privacy@someplace.com wrote:

Absolute nonsense.
Joe
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More descriptive, it's often called an oscillating tool. A blade is mounted to it and it only moves left & right like 5 degrees at 10k to 20k oscillations per minute. Very good at plunge cuts & getting into places where you can't with other tools, expensive or not.
Check out http://oscillatingtool.org to get your feet wet. Google around. Post any specific questions back here of course.
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ps another link.. Lots of Google info as I said. Should you compare any "kits", make note of the number of pieces the kit contains based on price. They toss in a bunch of pieces of sandpaper. A 5 piece of sandpaper counts as much as a $10 blade.
http://oscillating-tools.com /
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wrote:

Yeah, me too.
What I don't like about multi-function tool is that it woudl have the same name, no matter which set of functions. It should be called a screwdriver-voltmeter-chainsaw, so we'd know what it does.

OT. Then what's the angle grinder that has two circular blades going the opposite direction? Specifically, what does harbor freight call their cheap one? I suddently need one, I think, but don't remember what it's called.
Thanks.
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On 11/30/2010 4:04 PM, Bob-tx wrote:

get big bucks for their units. Here's a link: http://www.fein.de/fein-multimaster/us/en/main / It's basically a orbital tool that accepts a sander plate or cutters. The good thing is that you can get into places where other tools can't. You can get copy cats for $40 or even less, with some brand names (not Fein) costing maybe $100 or so.
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In addition to everything that has been said, it will do stuff that these tools can not: jig saw rotozip dremel recip saw and I am sure I could add to that list.
I bought and used mine the first time for a specific cut that no tool I owned could make. That was cutting 1/4" off the bottom of some fake rafters of a dormer that was sitting on a roof. I needed to be able to tuck some shingles up there like the builder did in 1963.
The most understated thing, in this thread, that it can do is remove about 50 years worth of bad caulk jobs from a brick house and the brick mold with no damage to either. It can do this in 1/10th or less the time it would take to do it by convential methods. We are talking about that old petro based caulk for the first 20 or 30 years. Worth the price if you never use it for anything but this.
As soon as I find the time to write it I plan to post a photo illustrated article or two about this tool.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit http://www.househomerepair.com
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I don't know how in-depth your article(s) will be, so I'll offer this info:
I don't know how specific a cut the average Joe would make, but you might include the use of teflon coated blades, if available in/for the DIYer or professional construction arena.
In the medical field, original (non-teflon coated) blades were fine, when cutting gypsum casts. These days (*since the early-mid 1970s), fiberglass casts are often the norm and the older blades would create, not only, excess heat (hot enough to burn a patient), but a build-up of fiberglass would collect on the blades/teeth (contributing, more so, to heat build-up). Heat build-up was/is, also, a concern when cutting bone. *These days, teflon coated blades are available and greatly reduced heat build-up and reduced material build-up on the blade/teeth.
A build-up of resin on the blade/teeth, when cutting wood, or build-up of a finish (many are heat sensitive) might be an issue for some DIY and/or construction applications. Excess heat may result in unwanted burn marks on wood, also. Teflon coated blades may/likely reduce heat/ resin/finish/(old petro based caulk?) build-up, should these kinds of issues be a concern.
I don't know if teflon coated blades are available, outside the medical field, for oscillating saws. I would suppose they are available.
Sonny
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Bob-tx wrote:

As others have said, it's a consumer version of an orthopedic surgeon's bone saw.
In addition to sanding in tight places, making otherwise impossible cuts in wood, substituting for a hacksaw on copper pipes, scraping the bejesus out of almost anything, slicing through grout, it can also emulsify otherwise non-miscible liquids (i.e., oil & water) and, when fitted with the appropriate attachement which I have yet to find, drive females into paroxysms of pleasure.
The latest Harbor Freight flyer, which I received just today, has a coupon for their model at only $24.95.
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Orthopedics used them to remove casts at least 20 years ago.

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The cast cutter saw has been around for a long time. Dr. Stryker invented the oscillating saw and it was patented Nov 16, 1947. Later, its use, for bone cutting, was introduced into the sterile surgery arena, but it had to dispense with the electrical cord, so it became an air driven instrument. The Stryker company makes many medical devices, these days. Stryker.com
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On Tue, 30 Nov 2010 15:04:42 -0600, "Bob-tx" <NOBSPAM

You mean you never saw the ads on TV for the Fein brand. Heck, they were on almost hourly in the past year.
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snipped-for-privacy@someplace.com wrote:

Yep. Because their patent expired. they've got to actually promote the product.
Now we have equivalent tools from Harbor Freight, Dremel, Bosch, Rockwell, Craftsman, and a plethora of "no-name" brands.
Now, Fein has to actually promote their product.
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Thanks, I have been well educated. Appreciate the info'. I had never heard of one. Not much of a TV watcher except for college football. Not much to watch this year as far as the UT Longhorns though. Maybe next year. Hook em horns.
Bob-tx
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