Another Lawnmower won't run question.

Hi Folks, When I stored my lawnmower last fall, I left a little fuel with winterizer in it.
I drained the fuel out put in new fuel, primed it several times and tried to start. I runs for a couple of seconds then stall with white smoke coming out of the carburetor. If I prime it again it does the same thing.
It's a Quantum Master with a B&S 5.0, several years old.
What can I check for to keep it running ?
Thanks Dick
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If you are starting in the spring, start at step 9. If you are starting in the fall, start at step 1.
1. Never leave fuel in the mower over winter, even with Stabil or another fuel treatment. Run it dry, dry, dry before storing.
2. When storing, pull your air cleaner and the fuel line at the tank. Get a can of pressurized carberator (sp ?) cleaner and spray a bunch into the fuel line and into the air intake. Pull the motor over several times. It may even "start" on the carb cleaner. Don't worry about that. You are trying to get rid of all gas reside in the fuel line and carb so that it doesn't "gum up" while stored.
3. After you've pulled the motor over a few times, reconnect your fuel line and reinstall the air filter after you have cleaned the filter.
4. Pull your spark plug and clean it. get the oil and goop off it. Spray a bunch of carb cleaner in the plug hole. Oil the plug threads lightly and reinstall the plug loosely and put the plug wire on. Again pull the motor over several times. So far you have invested maybe 15 minutes if you are a slow wroker.
5. Safely dispose of all the gas in your gas can. Run it in your car.
6. Pull your blade off and send it out to be serviced, or if you know how, sharpen it yourself.
7. While the blade is off, thoroughly thoroughly clean all the crud off the mower deck underside. This is the longest job you'll have, maybe a half hour. Reinstall sharpened blade. Put mower to bed for winter.
8. Spring time, buy new gas. Treat with Stabil or similar product.
9. Get new spark plug. Replace old plug. Lightly oil threads before inserting new plug. Tighten new plug. Attach plug wire, making sure you have a tight connection at plug.
10. Make sure tank is completely drained. Again pull your air cleaner and the fuel line at the tank. Get a can of pressurized carberator (sp ?) cleaner and spray a bunch into the fuel line and into the air intake. Pull the motor over several times. It may even "start" on the carb cleaner. Don't worry about that. You are trying to get rid of all gas reside in the fuel line and carb and any "gum" that might have formed over winter.
11. After you've pulled the motor over a few times, reconnect your fuel line. Install a new air filter.
12. Fill tank with new gas.
13. Start mower.
Your white smoke symtom says to me very dirty plug, and probably too much gum in cyinder from old gas. Carb cleaner, carb cleaner, fresh gas, new plug.
--
Jim McLaughlin

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Forgot two steps -- call 'em 9A and 14 A--
9A, Check and top off the oil.
14 A. Right after you run one tank of gas through it in the spring, while the motor is still hot from that run, drain the old oil and replace with fresh new oil.
--
Jim McLaughlin

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Thanks Jim, Replaced the plug, sprayed the carb and cleaned the air filter, Started on 2nd pull with no white smoke.
Thanks again, Dick
"Jim McLaughlin" <jim.mclaughlin> wrote in message

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Jim McLaughlin wrote:

sit over the winter with fuel in it. However, twice I followed the religion that requires running it dry in the fall and this resulted in a carb rebuild because the gasket in the middle with the acceleration pump had gotten hard or leaked.

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On Thu, 18 May 2006 08:09:39 -0400, Stubby

This is more or less my experience, too, although I never had to rebuild the carb. I've found that leaving the tank full of stabilized gasoline makes for an easy start in Spring. In my experience, leaving the tank and fuel line empty means a harder start, but eventually I've been able to get all my various motors started. Brushing off the spark contacts with a wire brush helps, or you can replace them. Also, you have to be careful not to overprime the motor and flood it, a natural tendency to which I have often fallen prey.
A few years ago, I pulled the cord on an old Amerind Mackissick leaf shredder that had not been started for nearly two decades and it started on the third pull! Amazing. I can't recall if it had old stabilized gas in it or not.

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I have six gasoline engines that need to be winterized every year:
riding lawn mower push mower for trim brush mower for trails weed eater chainsaw go-kart
I use StaBil in all of them at the end of the season. I do not drain the gas.
The important thing is to make sure you run the engine for a while after adding the StaBil, so that it gets out of the gas tank and into the carburetor.
Two years ago, I added StaBil to the riding mower but put it away without running the engine (I got interrupted midway through and forgot to come back and do it). The following spring I had one heck of a time getting the engine to start. What finally worked was, I added a whole bottle of Chevron Techron to the gas tank, and cranked the engine for about 10 seconds once a day. After about a week it started.
Other than that occurrence, I've never had any trouble with any of the engines.
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I see Jim has posted a list of excellent suggestions and with these recommendations you should have NO trouble at all.
If I may add my 2 cents worth, you could move to Texas and store your mower in a shed, like I do and the ONLY trouble I have had in the spring is that I have to pull the cord TWICE, in order for it to start, instead of the usual once. :-)
Lewis.
******
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the bowl nut has a tiny passage in it that is probably blocked..... jmo.. running one dry just puts lots of air in the fuel bowl..air with humidity..oh yeah,,that fuel tank has air in it to when empty.air and humidity.when you run one dry there is allways some gas left in there..and then ther'es the air,air with humidity,and that humidity usually condenses as the temp goes up and down..... lucas
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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