Another gyprock question


Hello,
I have done gyprocking before and did do a wonderful job on my mothers basement back in 1981 or so... A few things I can't remember or maybe it wasn't invented back in the day.LOL .. My question is this...... Is there a difference between ceiling gyprock and wall gyprock? I am going to completely gyprock a bedroom (10X13) with 1/2 inch. Do I just buy the sheets for the entire area or do I have to seperate wall type from ceiling type? Reason why I ask this is my brother said one type has a green stripe and other has a red stripe incicating ceiling? Or is my brother bullsh*tting me? Thanks... Jim
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Just get regular 1/2 inch sheetrock...Don't make it more complicated then it needs to be for a small bedroom...If you are concerned about sagging , strap the ceiling 16 OC with with 1X3 fir strapping...It comes in bundles of varing lenghs and is available at ALL lumber places and Big boxes......I don't do a ceiling without it....
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Jim wrote:

There are different types of wallboard. My preference is 5/8" type X on a basement bedroom ceiling. (better sound control, better fire rating, and more sag resistance than regular 1/2")
If you want to go with 1/2", they do make a special 1/2" high strength ceiling panel. There's no reason you couldn't use that for the entire room if you want to keep things simple. (Assuming there aren't any local building codes requiring 5/8" type X)
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Let's see...How can I make this more expensive and or complicated than that ?? LOL..I could but I won't...You have sufficiently muddied the waters enough....It's a small bedroom for crying out loud....
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benick wrote:

You already did. Or do you not recall suggesting that he strap the ceiling with 1x3s?
It's neither complicated nor significantly more expensive to hang 5/8" on ceilings and 1/2" on walls. Ditto for using 1/2" high strength ceiling panels for the whole project.

You might be surprised to learn that small rooms make up a significant portion of some people's homes, and that they take pride in doing a good job, even in those rooms.
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Strapping the ceiling is SOP and is available everywhere..Special order sheetrock not so much...Strapping also helps hold the weight of the insulation off the drywall preventing screw pops and sagging as well as making the ceiling less wavey and is a MUCH stronger finished product with less chance of cracking....But you probably know more about it than I do...I've only done it every day for about 20 years...
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benick wrote:

Must be a regional and/or recent SOP. I saw hundreds of new construction ceilings, residential to light commercial, installed as a kid in Indiana, and never saw strapping used once. Only time I ever saw it was on remodels, to even out a wavy ceiling, with shims as needed.
Not saying you are wrong, mind you, or that it is a bad idea. Just that I never saw it commonly done.
-- aem sends...
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SOP for about 20 years here in New England...You must be an old fart...LOL...
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wrote:

No. Old farts uses lathe and plaster.
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benick wrote:

No, but I haven't swung a hammer for pay in about 25-30 years- decided I wanted me one of them inside jobs with a steady paycheck, so I went to work for the gummint. (And the knowledge I gained on the construction sites as a kid as been easily as useful as the knowledge I gained in college, but I digress...)
I'll admit, southern/central Indiana doesn't have near the volume of 100-300 year old houses like New England does. Last time I was up there a few years ago, I didn't see ANY new construction on residences, since all the little towns are pretty well built out. I'm sure there must be young suburbs somewhere up there, but not in any of the places where my relatives live.
-- aem sends...
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benick wrote:

Perhaps in your locale. From the discussions I've seen, strapping is not a widespread practice in the US. It seems to be most popular in parts of the NE, but like many cause-we-always-done-it-that-way practices, it can vary from one town to the next.
Around here, walls are framed 8' 1-1/8" from subfloor to joist. That allows for 5/8 drywall and 1/2" gap at the bottom. If we decided to start strapping every ceiling, we'd either have to convince the framers to build the walls 3/4" higher or we'd be stripping 3/4" off the lower sheets on the walls. If strapping is standard in your locale and you want to quit doing it, you'd have to use your drywall stretcher to make up the 3/4". Inertia wins the argument.

Neither 5/8" nor 1/2" ceiling board are special order in my locale. Both the drywall supply house and the local Menards stock them.

That shouldn't be a problem with normal insulation loads. R49 fiberglass is <1lb/sqft. 5/8" with 24oc and 1/2" ceiling board with 16oc are rated for 2.2lb/sqft. 1/2" ceiling 24oc is rated at 1.3.

If the framing is wavy then shims and strapping can be a good way to address that problem. That isn't a reason to strap every ceiling.

Strapping isn't structural. Maybe your strapping provides a similar function to the blocking and/or bridging between joists which is standard here. And cracking isn't a problem.

I might.

I haven't done it _every_ day, but I started before you. :p (And good god man, take a day off now and then.)
Next up: Mesh vs. Paper. Why your choice sucks.
Followed by: Adhesive. If I use this glue crap, can I get by with using one screw in the field?
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Here is a Bing search with many links for you to look over about strapping a ceiling...Pay CLOSE attention to the one about Truss movement and learn how to do it right...
http://www.bing.com/search?q=strapping%20a%20ceiling%20for%20drywall&first=1&FORM=PERE
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benick wrote: (snip)

http://www.bing.com/search?q=strapping%20a%20ceiling%20for%20drywall&first=1&FORM=PERE

OK, I'll look...
1. An East Coast jack-of-all-trades thinks strapping is a good idea. No surprise there, but no compelling rationale either.
2. TOH video. Remodel. They're hanging over an existing strapped and lathed ceiling. They made some structural changes, so need to add a bit of strapping to maintain the existing plane of the ceiling before hanging. Also note they use 5/8 firecode, not 1/2".
3. DIY site. "the ceiling should be strapped to ease installation." "Installation is about 5x more difficult! Without strapping" Not a good reason, unless you find hanging difficult without it. "Unlike wall installations where the studs never move." Wall studs never move? He must not ever operate doors or windows. Nor does he have kids. "Joists flex under the weight of foot traffic and furniture above" Deflection in properly framed floors isn't a problem for drywall (L/240).
4. DIY guy wants to strap his ceiling because the electrician ran cable under the joists. The only responder to suggest he should strap the ceiling says he's "no expert" and is just "under the impression" that strapping is a good idea.
5. DIY guy wants to know whether to strap or not. Respondent says: "Strapping is usually used to fix defects in the framing - joists with too much span or uneven. If the joists/rafters are uneven, shimming the strapping will help to level it out. It can also be neccesary to allow for more insulation and/or air space for ventilation. Attaching directly to the joists/rafters is the most common method."
6. Duplicate of #1. Yes, the same exact article.
7. Someone asks a question about the strapping in the video in #2. He hasn't ever seen it done before. The only response is an incorrect guess that he's talking about hat channel.
8. Same TOH video as #2
9. Guy wants to strap to fix an out of plane ceiling joist problem. Professional drywaller suggest RC channel rather than wood strapping. Another concurs. OP says strapping and shimming is a pain.
#10 is Yahoo! Answers. Someone asking if 32"oc is too much of a span for drywall. I'm going to guess that one of the answers is yes, and that he should install strapping.
I did a bit of looking around myself and didn't find much suggesting strapping is routinely done for any reason other than <Tevye>tradition... TRADITION! </Tevye>
I did find one actual building professional who says that 1x4 strapping is better than bridging for reducing floor bounce. But that's a fix for a problem that shouldn't be present in new construction, not a way to get a better ceiling.
As for truss lift, I don't see how strapping would help with that. If the strapping is attached to the truss, and the wallboard is attached to the strapping, it's all going to move together. How is that different than if the drywall were attached directly to the truss?
I found one reputable guy who says strapping helps with the truss uplift problem, but it's clear from his explanation that the strapping is done _before_ the non-load bearing walls are framed, and that the top plates are attached to the strapping rather than the trusses. I can see how that would help as long as the strapping wasn't attached to the trusses near where the top plates where attached to the strapping. But that would _not_ apply to cases where strapping was applied after the interior walls were framed, which is what you appear to be advocating.
The answer to truss uplift is floating the corners and/or roof-truss clips. At least, that's what the engineers, building scientists, and gypsum association say.
I'm not aware of any building codes nor wallboard manufacturer's specifications which recommend or require strapping. I never hesitate to point out that codes are minimum, rather than optimal, standards, so I'm not claiming strapping might not have it's advantages. I just don't think it's necessary to strap to get a high quality ceiling, and I think that's pretty much the consensus opinion.
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It's hacks like you that make guys like me that do it right look good....Thanks..Keep up the good work...
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