Another circuit breaker question

Several weeks ago I asked about an oven circuit breaker tripping but then working afterwards. Now, being a confirmed worrywart, I'm very tempted to buy a spare double 40A breaker - just in case. I priced them at TruValue hardware and I only noticed one type at $9. Is there more than one type of such breakers? I'd much prefer not to pull the current breaker and bring it with me.
Also, any tips on removing and replacing such a breaker? I've never replaced a big one like this before.
TIA
--
"Where there's smoke there's toast!" Anon






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On 2/27/2013 12:01 PM, KenK wrote:

styles of double pole breakers. Depending upon the type and manufacturer, they are installed and removed differently as well. A very typical plug in breaker hooks into the panel near where the wire is connected, and snaps into the panel buss at the other end. If I were you, I'd kill the main breaker before experimenting
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If you are not sure what brand/style breaker you have, you may want to take the old one with you.
That breaker info should be on the label in the panel tho.
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Yes, several different types. Should replace much the same as the smaller ones, but double wide for the double forty.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Several weeks ago I asked about an oven circuit breaker tripping but then working afterwards. Now, being a confirmed worrywart, I'm very tempted to buy a spare double 40A breaker - just in case. I priced them at TruValue hardware and I only noticed one type at $9. Is there more than one type of such breakers? I'd much prefer not to pull the current breaker and bring it with me.
Also, any tips on removing and replacing such a breaker? I've never replaced a big one like this before.
TIA
--
"Where there's smoke there's toast!" Anon








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you are buying the proper breaker. For instance a Square D "homeline" breaker does not fit a standard square D panel, and a seimens breaker won't fit either Square D panel - etc. etc.
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The only way to be absolutely sure is to take the old breaker with you. Have someone videotape you removing the old breaker so that you have a clue how the replacement goes back in. It is too easy to forget over a period of several hours, so be cautious and do the videotaping. Also, turn the main house breaker off before you remove the questionable breaker.
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On 2/27/2013 11:01 AM, KenK wrote:

The box will have a list of approved breaker styles in/on it--find that and note them. Any UL-listed breaker of the given type is compatible whether it's a replacement from one of the universal suppliers of the same manufacturer; any not on the list aren't. Pretty straightforward.

They're no different than any other in the box...if it isn't patently clear to you from the panel how they are installed look up the box on the web from the manufacturer's site...
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Breakers are not like fuses. Fuses wear out over time and are supposed to fail if there's a circuit problem, so replacements should be kept on hand. Breakers are designed to trip and then be reset numerous times without failure. Some manufacturers even suggest "excercising" breakers by turning them off and on periodically.
Based upon my experience involving four houses over 50 years, I've never had a breaker fail. But, if one does, you can usually find a lightly loaded circuit in the breaker box and temporarily connect the essential circuits to that until a replacement is installed. That's just a screwdriver job, but it requires turning the main power off and checking beforehand to make sure there is extra capacity available.
I'm also a worrier and tend to keep repair parts for appliances, windows, pumps and other house hardware on hand; but whenever I move, most of that stuff ends up in a box on the shelf for the next owner. Worrying can get expensive.
Tomsic
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Given that it's a 40 amp, 240V for an oven, that seems unlikely.....
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On 3/1/2013 9:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

and breakers do wear out over time.
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I did not know fuses would wear out. They do 'fail' when there is a problem.
I worked as an electrician in a large plant that had thousands of breakers and more fuses than breakers. In over 20 years we did replace a few breakers that had gone bad. This did not hapen very often, and was usually because there was a problem that caused the breaker to be reset several times. Many fuses blew and breakers tripped because of starting and stopping motors in short periods of time.
Some times a breaker would trip without an apparent problem and when reset would not trip again unless there was a problem. This was not very often, and may have been because too much was turned on at one time. We did have a problem with a breaker tripping in a break area and was traced to having too many soft drink machines hooked up to the same circuit. If only one was running at a time it was fine. If one or two were running and the third one started, the breaker would trip due the excessive start up current. As usual , putting them on seperate circuits solved that problem.
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I was surprised too; but I've encountered several situations where the fuse either corroded from moisture or just seemed to lose continuity without melting the thermal link. One instance, involving a main cartridge fuse in a house, was because of prolonged heat due to a loose connector contact holding the fuse.
But now I'm curious -- does anyone have examples of home circuit breaker wear out (not failures due to lightning) and where the circuit breaker was not being used as a switch?
Tomsic
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That was not the case of the fuse wearing out, but other problems. The fuse blew because of heat build up due to a loose contact, not a worn out fuse. Same as for the corrosion on the fuse. Not worn out, but other problems caused it.
I knew of piece of equipment that used about 20 amps and had a 3AG type fues in it, about once a month the fuse had to be replaced. Looking in the glass you could see it was sagged down. It had gotten hot due to the holder not making good contact. That fues was bypassed and a fuse with larger contacting area and another type of holder was used in its place. No more problems.
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I had a main breaker burn up..
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Fedderated or a Rel.iance that failed at the cottage - had never tripped - only been turned off a handfull of times at best -and one side just started to sizzle.
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On Mar 1, 5:39 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Breakers are designed to get more sensitive as they age. They trip easier.
I used to spend days each month at a westinghouse circuit breaker plant in vanport beaver pa. A fascinating place they even offered me a job there.....
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wrote:

... unless they are Federal Pacific. They become pennies behind the fuse.
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On Mar 2, 1:18 am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

well yes every rule has a exception.........
I repair roll laminating machines for a living, they apply plastic to paper, a good example are menus. They draw 15 to 20 amps.
Anyhow I occasionally get called because they are tripping breakers. Usually theres also another load on the circuit like a microwave:(
But once in a while its a bad breaker.....
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On Fri, 1 Mar 2013 12:35:43 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

around when it heats and cools, and this work hardens the metal so eventually it just cracks and lets go. Not terribly common, but not uncommon either.
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http://www.buzzle.com/articles/circuit-breaker-keeps-tripping.html
Breaker Switch Keeps Tripping Causes
After the tripping incident, you go to the circuit breaker panel and once you turn the switch on, it again flips. Now, there's something wrong that's for sure. At this point you need to think what can be the main cause for this main problem.
Weak Circuit Breaker Weak breakers are one of the most common causes of continuous circuit tripping. The circuit becomes weak over time and also due to the overloading of electricity from time to time.
Read more at Buzzle: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/circuit-breaker-keeps-tripping.html
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Breakers are not like fuses. Fuses wear out over time and are supposed to fail if there's a circuit problem, so replacements should be kept on hand. Breakers are designed to trip and then be reset numerous times without failure. Some manufacturers even suggest "excercising" breakers by turning them off and on periodically.
Tomsic
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