Angle grinder for cutting wood

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Novice has small angle grinder (takes discs 115 mm with central hole diameter 22mm). The discs i've already got for it are for grinding tiles and metal.
Having knocked down a very old cedar garden shed, I want to cut up all the wood. I'm wondering if i buy one of the diamond discs available for it, whether that would be reasonably ok for cutting wood with? I cannot find any discs that are said to be specifially for wood for this type of angle grinder.
Some of the shed cladding wood is very thin (with nails all over the place) so i think the usual circular saw for wood would be a bit too hefty and vigourous on this thin wood of the shed. Grateful for any suggestions on the best type of circular disc to go for. Thanks.
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wrote:

No. A grinder will more likely start the wood on fire than cut it. There is good reason you don't find wood "blades" for an angle grinder. It's absolutely the wrong tool for the job.

A circular saw will work fine. Be careful with nails, though. A circular saw will cut them (as long as you don't care about the blade) but it might throw them too. Wear *lots* of protection. A "Sawsall" (reciprocating saw) is a better tool for the job, though.
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On May 15, 4:16 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Part of the woodcarver's standard arsenal, used in conjunction with a chainsaw. Regular coarse alox grinding wheels won't start a fire.
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Diamond blade plus angle grinder on a treet stump killed someone recently (kickback into neck). Suicidal.
You can use a cheap jigsaw with wood ripping blade if you cut them over a table. Very quick unless stuff is >2in thick. You can use a reciprocating saw - like a normal handsaw but two blades driven like hedge trimmer blades, but they cost somewhat more (better for chopping thro old studwork).
I would not suggest even a handheld circular because of the risk - you are working "sloppy-fast" which could result in kickback or accidents. The jigsaw would probably be best for thin cladding (shiplap etc), a lot quicker than you realise.
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On Sat, 15 May 2010 13:22:33 -0700 (PDT), js.b1 wrote:

The OP hasn't said what he intends to do with the cut wood. If it's for a wood burner reasonably uniform size and few splinters is desirable. Sawing would be the best, I used my table saw (and an old blade) to cut down the shiplap from our shed refurbishment. That was for the open fire.
If it's just to make managable for a bonfire, the quickest will be snapping though over ones knee will probably end up with a bruised knee fairly quickly. Much better to have a block on the ground a few inches high and tough pair of boots and use your weight or a stomp to break it up. I reckon that will be faster than a jigsaw and you still have the problem of holding the timber.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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I have a very cheap Wilkinson's 'Swallow' jigsaw which came with a good selection of blades. After making up maybe 20' of fence going up a steep slope, from old rescued fence boards of all different lengths, I was amazed at how easy it was to put a nice profile right along the top using one of the longer coarsish blades. Should be fine for your shed.
I also did almost buy a reciprocating saw in either Aldi of Lidl when they were going v cheap last year. At the time though, I thought I'd always be fit enough to use hand saws...
S
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spamlet has brought this to us :

The reciprocating saw will fit and cut, where you cannot possibly get a hand saw into. I have found mine to be particularly useful for cutting tree roots, whilst still buried in the ground.
--
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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Bet you go thru the blades doing that;!...
Which one have U got?..
73's
--
Tony Sayer


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tony sayer presented the following explanation :

No, none have worn out yet. I've managed to cut 12" trees down with it, lots of roots and cut 4" alloy bar stock.

The blue black Aldi variable speed one. The spring which closes the lever for foot adjustment seems to have weakened (may just be choked up with saw dust), other than that it works well.
--
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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I have an even cheaper PPro one I bought in a clearance and it does roots really well. It says maximum cut 100mm but it cuts anything the blade fits, I have some 10" green wood blades and it works fine. For demolition I have some tungsten tipped blades and just cut through the wood and metal. The whole lot was ~£20.
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Harry Bloomfield wrote:

What's the travel like on the blades of those saws? I certainly have a need for a rough'n ready powered saw for that sort of use, but had always thought they looked a bit too small, and Alligator-types were a bit OTT/out of my price range. But taking out a 12" tree sounds reasonably impressive...
David
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Lobster formulated on Sunday :

Travel is about 2" and the blade was 9" long, so I had to cut from three sides to get all the way through.
--
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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Harry Bloomfield wrote:

And there's always harbor freight for a cheap source. Better than using an angle grinder and having an accident.
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Bob F wrote:

--
aem sends...

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On Sun, 16 May 2010 09:35:11 +0100, Harry Bloomfield

about anywhere. And unlike the cheap clones, it will do it decade after decade.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Valid, but only relevant if you are making money with it, or use it a LOT. For occasional users like me, a cheap knockoff like my B&D corded that I bought almost new at a garage sale for 20? bucks, is probably more than sufficient. It probably wouldn't last a month on an active jobsite, but at a dozen or so cuts a year, it will outlast me.
Don't get me wrong- Milwaukee tools (at least the pro-grade they used to sell at the supply houses- never looked at the big-box versions) are great, but for those of us with limited demands and a limited budget, they are overkill. Like buying Snap-on wrenches to change the lawnmower sparkplug once a year.
--
aem sends...

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wrote:

My Millwaukee Sawzall cost me $15.00. Got it for nothing and bought the part that had worn out and fixed it. With the cheap ones, when they quit they are DONE because generally parts are unavailable.

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wrote:

my best HF buy was an exact clone of a Bosch 1581 jigsaw for >$100 less than what the Bosch would have cost. I don't use it often,but it works great. they don't sell them any more,either.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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I tend to put a chain round roots - leaving a bit of the stump attached - and then jacking the stump out of the ground using fence posts for leverage. Of course, I'm talking garden sized things rather than large native trees...
S
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js.b1 wrote:

Bull. Diamond wheel on an angle grinder is the wrong combination, but not for that reason. Kickback has nothing to do with the wheel on the grinder, but instead has everything to do with where on contacts the wheel. Suicidal? Not at all. One stupid move on the part of a user does not make a tool suicidal.

A reciprocating saw more typically just has one blade that simply, well... reciprocates.

It's fairly difficult to develop kickback with a circular saw. Not impossible, but not easy. A circular saw would make a good choice for materials 1/2" and up. Below that, I'd probably just break the stuff over my knee...
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@windstream.net
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