...And that's why I keep SharkBite End Caps in the shop

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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo posted for all of us...

If they spotted you they wouldn't let you in your part of the country.
--
Tekkie

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On Mon, 21 Mar 2016 16:50:27 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

And most of them are just a stainless braid over plastic..A piece of annealed copper does the jog just fine.
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On Mon, 21 Mar 2016 20:37:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The ones I'm referring to are solid copper, with spiral ribs, so it can be bent any way you like. Unless they are no longer sold, they were readily available, but it's been years since I needed any such thing. I would not plastic with a braid over it either. I avoid all plastics when it comes to plumbing. I saw what happened to a neighbor when their plastic supply tube broke under their toilet, and the elderly woman was asleep. Many thousands of dollars damage, including flooring, all carpet, and so on. She was knocking on my door early in the morning, in tears. I quickly went there and shut her water off. She wanted me to fix it, but I told her she needed to have her insurance company come first, and told her I could fix it, but since I'm not a licensed plumber, she needed to get someone with a license, to satisfy the insurance company.
The following day, I replaced 4 of these plastic supply lines under my own sinks, with chrome-brass ones. Plastic is fine for toys and picture frames, auto dashboards, molding, and anything that is not supporting weight or pressure. It is NOT for plumbing, and also NOT for lawn chairs (I've seen several people hurt on collapsing plastic lawn chairs). I will make an exception to this, as far as PVC drain pipes, but those are not under pressure, and work fine. Drainage is the only time I use plastics in plumbing.
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On 3/21/2016 9:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

I had one of those put in when the house was built. It sprang a leak in a bad spot so I replaced it with another. Two years later, it leaked again. Out it went and I replaced it with PEX and it has been good for 15 years now.
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I've seen those copper spiral tubes last many years. But like anything, there are defective items made, and maybe the manufacturer was making all bad parts. I've never used them myself. I prefer to connect the tank direct with copper pipe because it's cheaper, and I think it looks better. I did see a house where all the plumbing froze, and the ends of both of those spiral tubes separated from the tubes. But none of that stuff is made for freezing, and I'd think all those ribs would cause excessive pressure on the pipe, because the ice would be applying a lot of pressure against every rib.
I would not normally recommend them, because they are really not needed, and they are costly. But in this thread, it was mentioned that the pipes were not properly aligned and I thought that would be an easy way to correct it, rather than redoing more pipes.
For all I know, they may not even sell them anymore. Plumbing stuff changes all the time. Even the old brass spiral gas pipes have now changed (for behind a gas stove). Those were always the same for years, but when I was young, I always feared having one break, when I moved the stove for cleaning behind it. But I guess they were stronger than they looked. Someone always comes up with something they consider better. Sometimes it is better, but often it's just a way to make stuff cheaper so the company can make more money.
By the way, PEX is not supposed to be connected directly to a water heater. When I was considering using PEX, I did a lot of checking on this, from actual plumbers. It's suggested to put at least 6" of pipe before it. Some plumbers said more, and if it's a gas WH, it's not suppose to be anywhere near the chimney pipe. But if it's lasted you 15 years, it should last another year or two before it gets real brittle and snaps in half or crumbles, which is how all plastics generally deteriorate and eventually fail....
And since we're talking about PEX, has anyone ever determined how many chemicals a person ingests whenever they drink water from a PEX plumbing system? Just wondering.... Our bodies need some iron or copper, and all pipes leach at least a little of their material. This is the same reason I dont buy bottled water and buy all my soda, beer and other beverages in cans or glass bottles, not plastic.
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On Tuesday, March 22, 2016 at 12:14:33 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Are you frigging kidding me?
In your earlier post you said:
"The ideal solution would be to install one of those flexible copper (or stainless steel) pipes made for water heaters."
Note the word *ideal*.
So are you saying that you don't prefer *ideal* solutions?

"Easy" rarely equates to "ideal". Which word are you now going with as far as the flexible WH tubes? Easy or Ideal?
In the case of my repair, the ideal solution turned out to be fairly easy. One extra fitting and a shim. Now I have straight copper (just like you like it) and everything lines up perfectly and in a relaxed manner.
It actually would have been more work to go out and buy your "ideal" solution than it was to solder a few fittings.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/3-4-in-x-24-in-FIP-x-S-Copper-Water-Heater-Connector-7211-24-34FIP-S/202692481

That's funny! Are the beverages you are buying 100% natural?
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo posted for all of us...

Why don't you be finished with newsgroups and find out how to use a search engine?
--
Tekkie

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On Tue, 22 Mar 2016 11:13:46 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Half the cans have a thin plastic coating, so you better stick to glass. Your "other beverages" come in a mason jar??
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo posted for all of us...

Don't have a bad mitral valve in your heart because they will replace it with ....drum roll,,, plastic.
--
Tekkie

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On Tuesday, March 22, 2016 at 3:30:31 PM UTC-4, Tekkie® wrote:

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If the mitral valve acts like a drain, then PC should be okay with that.
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DerbyDad03 posted for all of us...

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--
Tekkie

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On Fri, 18 Mar 2016 21:30:16 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I'd also get my water tested. In some parts of the country it can corrode copper.
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On Friday, March 18, 2016 at 10:47:44 PM UTC-5, Vic Smith wrote:

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"Although pinhole leaks could happen in any copper pipe or tube within a ho use, the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) reported that the m ajority of pinhole leaks that their customers had reported were in cold-wat er, horizontal copper piping. Most of the leaks were in older homes, and 80 percent of the reports involved homes built prior to 1970."
Source http://www.repairmyleak.com/about/failure-copper.htm
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On Saturday, March 19, 2016 at 5:00:04 PM UTC-4, bob_villain wrote:

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house, the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) reported that the majority of pinhole leaks that their customers had reported were in cold-w ater, horizontal copper piping. Most of the leaks were in older homes, and 80 percent of the reports involved homes built prior to 1970."

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On Saturday, March 19, 2016 at 5:00:04 PM UTC-4, bob_villain wrote:

Mine was in a hot water pipe.

Mine was in a vertical pipe.

Mine was built in 1956.
=NOT(2 out of 3)
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On Saturday, March 19, 2016 at 5:47:51 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Don't shoot the messenger, there is other good information on that site!
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On Saturday, March 19, 2016 at 9:57:41 PM UTC-4, bob_villain wrote:

Not shooting, just sayin'
;-)
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On Sat, 19 Mar 2016 13:59:58 -0700 (PDT), bob_villain

Most common in type M copper too. (the cheap stuff with the red print) Less common in Type L (blue print) and almost unheard of in Type K (green print)
L ang K are available soft as well, while M is hard only. Hard L and K can be annealed if a small bend is required.
M is only .028 thick. L is .040 and K is .049
If buying a house anf it is plumbed with M (red print) pipe, figure on doing some major replumbing before too long. If you don't have to, you come out ahead. If you don't plan for it and do have to, you loose pretty big-time.
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On 3/19/2016 9:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I would'a put a piece of rubber and hose clamp on it and called it good.
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question forr the poster in morton grove where PEX isnt approved.
do the big box stores like home depot and lowes sell it anyway??
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