An actual home repair question

House built in the mid 40's with cast iron drains in the crawl space. Already replaced the 40 or so feet of terra cotta sewer pipe w/black ABS and Fernco couplings years ago. Recently had a section of the drainage system under the house rotted out and I replaced the length with ABS fittings. Now plan on replacing the toilet drain, flange and the rest with ABS this Summer Question is: I've been told some cities allow ABS while others don't How do I find out without going to the permit dept and getting "outed" for what's been done already.
Never mind. This dumb-assed city hasn't stepped up into the modern world yet
CCPed from Plumbing codes: ABS and PVC drainage piping installations are not allowed
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On Mon, 21 Mar 2016 08:35:17 -0700 (PDT), Shade Tree Guy

If you are not involving them, why do you care?
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On Monday, March 21, 2016 at 8:42:06 AM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I don't really care. Was just curious Several neighbor's have used ABS, the local Hommie Depot sells it and have yet to see anyone forced to dig up or rip out ABS fixtures. Interesting that the State allows ABS and PVC while cities can set their own standards (Is someone getting paid off by the Plumber's Union?)
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On Mon, 21 Mar 2016 08:55:36 -0700 (PDT), Shade Tree Guy

I think you have put your finger on it. You have code boards dominated by old tradesmen who are frustrated that technology has made those old skills they had 50 years ago obsolete. I understand that it took a lot of skill to measure/cut/thread galvanized pipe and pour oakum and molten lead into cast iron hubs but these days anyone can learn how to paste plastic pipe in a day. As you already know, that cast iron pipe will rust out eventually and the plastic will be around for 1000 years. The skill that still remains is getting the pitch right and making sure your venting is right so you are not sucking the water out of your traps. That is where you need to be concerned about the code.
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On Monday, March 21, 2016 at 11:35:24 AM UTC-4, Shade Tree Guy wrote:

OK, if you are going to post "An actual home repair question", why not use a relevant subject line. Can you imagine what this ng would be like if everyone used generic subject lines like:
Home Repair Question Need Repair Help Home Needs Repair
How would anyone know what thread they were interested in following?
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On Monday, March 21, 2016 at 9:22:26 AM UTC-7, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Agreed! Sadly 90% of the verbiage in the group concerns mindless cross-posted rantings and ravings about s**t that most of us don't give a s**t about to begin with.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

That sounds like "fuzzy math" to me. It appears that 90% would be the "most", and if they didn't give a s**t they wouldn't be ranting and raving about s**t.
--
RonNNN

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On 3/21/2016 11:35 AM, Shade Tree Guy wrote:

Simple. Do what works and don't involve the permit department. Is it going to be visible? If so, box it in if you ever sell the house. If you live there until you die, who cares?
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On Monday, March 21, 2016 at 10:31:49 AM UTC-7, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Exactly There are people on the street that replace roofs, add on rooms, do major renovations and I've never seen a permit posted or an inspector show up.(except once when a lady who was out bid on a neighborhood eyesore turned in the "contractors") Years ago I learned (after the fact) the city wants ya to get a permit just to install an automatic lawn sprinkler system!
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On 3/21/2016 1:55 PM, Shade Tree Guy wrote: > > Years ago I learned (after the fact) the city wants ya to get a permit just to install an automatic lawn sprinkler system!

They want to be sure you have a backflow preventer installed. That would be common sense, but people will skimp on it.
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On Monday, March 21, 2016 at 11:03:41 AM UTC-7, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

They are part of the valve system installed. What I should have also installed was a manual shut off valve up stream of the system (easy to add on)
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On 3/21/2016 10:55 AM, Shade Tree Guy wrote:

Because most folks are 100% clueless about what is required and *why*!
I'm reasonably sure 80-90% of the homes, here, with irrigation systems of varying types are NOT up to code. Here, you must install an antisiphon device at least 12" above the highest point in your irrigation system to ensure loss of muni water pressure will not cause the chemical soup that most folks use (to control weeds and insects) on their properties will not flow directly into the municipal water supply and your neighbors homes!
Every home in our neighborhood should have a PRV installed on the water supply (as our water pressure is 110psi -- much higher than the design spec for most appliances). I can count the number of homes that have them (water supply typically enters homes, here, right out front, well above grade -- so easy to see who has and who hasn't as you walk down the street!).
Of those with PRV's, I'd guesstimate less than half have an expansion tank installed (thereby nullifying the benefits of the PRV). Adding a tank (properly) is usually much more than a DIYer would be willing to tackle (and, apparently, many plumbers are happy to just take the "easy money" installing the PRV without fussing with trying to fit a tank to the system!)
The higher water pressure (for folks without PRV's) means their irrigation systems tend to be operating well above their design limits. This explains many of the ruptured irrigation lines, "popped" sprinklers/emitters, etc.
Just because you can buy the parts at your local big box store doesn't mean you KNOW how/what to install!
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