American Farmers Fight Rise In Hay Thefts

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wrote:

# Only the "rich" farmers have wrappers. #
Nah Only the ones who consider the cost of buying the wrapper worthwile

# How exactly do you grind up hay? #
With a hay grinder, you ignorant twit
# # Animals won't eat rotten hay. #
And ? Animals are quite capable of cherry-picking what they eat.
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wrote:

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wrote:

One purpose of grinding is to prevent them from cherry picking. Not to feed rotten hay http://www.rotogrind.com/advantages_1.html
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wrote:

# I know they are moved under cover as soon as possible to keep them dry. #
Bud do you know if they go to the cover or the cover comes to them <http://www.farmtek.com/farm/supplies/prod1 ;FarmTek_new_products;pg111193>
You keep reminding me of Ronald Reagan's aphorism "it's not that our friends on the left are ignorant. It's just that so much of what they know is wrong.."
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wrote:

I know they have to be stored in a well ventilated, dry place. Any moisture at all will cause the hay to rot. Away from damp in the ground too.
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wrote:> Bob F wrote:

# I know they have to be stored in a well ventilated, dry place. # Any moisture at all will cause the hay to rot. # Away from damp in the ground too.
Glad to see that you know something Too bad you seem unable to apply your knowledge appropriately. Not to mention, not letting your presumptions to get in the way.
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wrote:

knows this by now.
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wrote:

I know they are moved under cover as soon as possible to keep them dry.
{{
Rolled bales are often covered with sheet plastic and left in the fields for extended periods. At least in the fields here in N. Texas. (been a bit dry here abouts over the past several years so that may have something to do with the practice)
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Even dew will spoil hay. The black bags are not hay but silage. (Fermented grass) Silage BTW would be twice the weight of hay. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silage
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wrote:

# Even dew will spoil hay. # The black bags are not hay but silage. (Fermented grass) # Silage BTW would be twice the weight of hay. # http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silage
Poor harry A classic demonstration that limited knowledge is a dangerous thing <http://www.tudorag.com/Haywrap%20brochure%20web.pdf
Note how they are discussing hay bales, NOT silage
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harry wrote:

Hmm. When I visited the UK contryside, I saw many houses roofed with straw. From my reading, a thatched roof can last up to fifty years. And there are buildings in existence that were originally thatched 500 years ago, with up to seven feet of additional thatching implaced over the years.
Perhaps you should get out more.
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Straw and hay are not the same thing.
Perhaps you should have looked more closely. The thatched fifty year roofs are made using reeds which being a water plant are rot resistant. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thatching
Straw lasts for much less time. Hay would not last a year
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On 12/5/2012 11:45 AM, harry wrote:

Dude, out here in the big prairie states where huge acreage and large animal operations are the norm, farmers don't fool with the standard hay bales. They make massive round bales, which are cylindrical and weigh up to a ton each. Their shape means they shed rain easily, so they don't need to be covered. The outer layer may rot, but there's plenty of good solid hay tight and dry inside. It's not unusual to see bales on the edge of fields that were made over a year previously.
They're usually 4-6 feet tall, and are moved with a truck (hooked up and dropped on the bed) or by an all-terrain vehicle used as a skid loader. They're usually left in the fields where they're made. Farmers haul them in as they are needed.
It's leaving them out in the fields that makes them easy targets, especially the bales that are on the sides of a road.
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-snip-

You see more of the big ones in New York and New England than you do the little ones these days. It appears to me that the only folks who make the small bales are folks who are selling it.
I see a lot of them uncovered-- but almost as many in those giant white baggies these days.
Jim
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I caught one getting away.
http://zekfrivolous.com/trail/gotem.JPG
Greg
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Obviously legitimate. The point is where would crooks get access to machinery to handle a bale like this?
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wrote:

# Obviously legitimate. The point is where would crooks get access to # machinery to handle a bale like this?
Same place anyone else would With the added advantage that they could steal that too.
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On 12/8/12 1:39 AM, harry wrote:

equipment. Farmers steal for one thing. The brother of one of my high school classmates turned out to be a crook. He spent a couple years in prison if I remember right. A skid loader with boom forks would load a bale into a pickup. I've seen home made versions of the towable bale hauler I linked to a couple days ago. Rental places have equipment that would load bales. Construction crews have equipment that would load bales. This equipment isn't anything special in rural areas. It used to be that tractor keys would fit a particular tractor series. The 94 series of the old Case brand tractors would all use the same key for example. A thief could use the farmer's own equipment to load their loot. Ebay has keys for sale. One could walk into a tractor dealership and buy one. The guys who haul hay could steal a couple extra bales and mix them in with their legitimate load. Alfalfa is going for over $200 per ton. Corn stover is going for over $70/ton. Prices are FOB, freight on buyer. Link here: http://tinyurl.com/asod747
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