American Farmers Fight Rise In Hay Thefts

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Apparently, it's not enough to be thieving copper in Newark, or looting homes destroyed by hurricanes or forest-fire.
What could be lower than stealing hay from desperate farmers?
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http://stlouis.cbslocal.com/2012/12/03/missouri-farmers-fight-rise-in-hay-thefts /
December 3, 2012 9:49 AM
ST. LOUIS (KMOX) - As if its not bad enough that Missouri farmers are trying to survive the worst drought in decades, now many of them are facing a new problem thats costing them big bucks.
Missouri Farm Bureau president Blake Hurst says thieves are actually targeting those big bundles of hay that are left out in fields prior to being harvested, hauling them off and selling the valuable commodity.
Of course, no one brands their hay so if you hook onto it with your tractor or your pickup and make it out the gate, then its impossible to prove where the hay came from, Hurst said.
With winter approaching and grass dying out, the price for fresh hay to feed livestock is on the rise, and Hurst says that makes unguarded bales a tempting target.
Ironically, its because of the ongoing drought that fresh hay has become so valuable with the winter season fast approaching.
And its not just Missouri. This trend is happening in farm states across the country, so much so that some are now putting global positioning trackers inside their bales, in case theyre stolen.
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On Dec 5, 5:21am, Will Rogers <"W.Rogers"@Where the Wind Comes Sweepin' Down the.Plain> wrote:

Interesting story. How do they load a big bale of hay weighing half a ton or more? Why would hay be left outdoors anyway?
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On 12/5/12 1:09 AM, harry wrote:

With something as simple as this: http://tinyurl.com/bx3zy6m There are many loaders made for tractors, skid loaders and pickups. It isn't at all unusual for hay to be left outside. The bales might rot a bit on the outside but the interior is usually fine. We used to put what we could in the barn and stack the rest just outside the cow lot. This was in the days of the 60-80 pound rectangular bales. We loaded, unloaded, and stacked by hand. Ranchers in the Nebraska Sandhills used to make hay stacks with loose hay. A single haystack here: http://tinyurl.com/ajxoece A bunch of pictures here http://tinyurl.com/cqap8tf of various sized bales, hay equipment etc.
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Few people make small bales these days. Few people even make hay, they make silage. How do you steal a haystack of loose hay then?
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On 12/6/2012 1:16 AM, harry wrote:

Big vacuum cleaner you silly boy. ^_^
TDD
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On 12/6/12 1:16 AM, harry wrote:

With a stack mover, of course. A truck mounted one here: http://tinyurl.com/cxzd693 Hesston makes a lot of different types of hay equipment. There isn't much alfalfa in my area anymore. I don't remember anyone making silage out of it. It was always baled. A few farmers I know are raising alfalfa for a nearby dairy. They're baling it. Silage here (central Nebraska) is corn silage. The cattle feeders usually put it in bunker silos. A couple pictures here: http://tinyurl.com/a2lh9cm The hay shortage is prompting one change. There are a lot more guys baling their corn stover.
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wrote:

# # Few people make small bales these days. # Few people even make hay, they make silage. # How do you steal a haystack of loose hay then?
Keep spinning and trying to move the goalposts Isn't silage just one form of hay ? And since when is the subject "haystacks"
It's a sure sign that you realize you have once again been shown to be an ignorant idiot.
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wrote:

The only thing silage and hay need have in common is they are both animal feed and both might be made of grass.
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wrote:

# # The only thing silage and hay need have in common is they are both # animal feed and both might be made of grass.
Very good harry At least you have demonstrated that you actually know a factoid
Must be sad to need to be bitch-slapped the way you do.
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On Wednesday, December 5, 2012 2:09:38 AM UTC-5, harry wrote:

They're round. A couple of healthy men could easily roll them up a ramp into a pickup truck.
Most bales don't weigh anywhere near 1/2 ton anyway. <500lb bales can be lifted by 3-4 average men.

Buildings are expensive and harvest time is short. It is quite common to leave the bales lined up along the edge of the field they were made in, until they're needed at the farm. This saves on building costs and defers the hauling duties until the off-season.
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On Dec 5, 5:21am, Will Rogers <"W.Rogers"@Where the Wind Comes Sweepin' Down the.Plain> wrote:

The more I read that story the more BS it is.
How do you "hook into hay"? How are bales left out "prior to harvesting"?
Journalism has sunk pretty low in the USA.
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the Wind Comes Sweepin' Down the.Plain> wrote:

# # The more I read that story the more BS it is. #
First, read up on why round bales have become so popular <http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-1772/BAE-1716web.pdf
# How do you "hook into hay"?
One way with a pickup truck. All you need is a winch, a steel bar, an short length of cable with a loop at each end and a ramp 1) Shove the steel bar through the center of the roll 2) hook your short cable on each of the the bar 3) hook your winch to the cable 4) roll hay wheel up ramp to back of pickup
Alternately, you can install a crane on your pickup and just lift the bale on the back. < http://www.google.com/search?q=pickup+truck+crane&hl=en&tbo=u&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ei O_UN6BKqnwyQGH0oCgAQ&sqi=2&ved GIQsAQ&biw62&bihs1>
Third method, use a car transporter, drop the bed near the bales, and daisy-chain the bales onto the bed
# How are bales left out "prior to harvesting"? #
You're right that is a bit weak But harvesting could also include removing it from the field If you just cut, dry and roll it but leave it on the filed, the "harvesting" is only partial The last step, moving somewhere else for storage or use is yet to be done.
# Journalism has sunk pretty low in the USA.
Not as low as education in England, if we go by your performance.
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wrote:

How do you shove a steel bar through the centre of a hay bale? It is packed almost as hard as if it were a block of timber. And even if you succeeded, how would you get it out? I see you know as little as these journalists.
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the Wind Comes

# #How do you shove a steel bar through the centre of a hay bale? It is # packed almost as hard as if it were a block of timber.
Never heard of a bale spear ?
# And even if you succeeded, how would you get it out? # I see you know as little as these journalists.
Funny how farmers have no trouble either shoving in or pulling out their bale spears. You have to wonder how on earth they manage to do it...
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Much like the humming bird. Science has proven that it cannot fly.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
# And even if you succeeded, how would you get it out? # I see you know as little as these journalists.
Funny how farmers have no trouble either shoving in or pulling out their bale spears. You have to wonder how on earth they manage to do it...
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# Much like the humming bird. Science has proven that it cannot fly. #
Don't forget the bumble-bee is also not supposed to be able to fly But fly it does anyway. \
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On 12-05-2012 23:30, Attila Iskander wrote:

Two (false) urban legends meet on Usenet.
--
Wes Groleau

“Statistics are like bikinis.
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Only the finest false internet legends for our discriminating readers.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote in message

Two (false) urban legends meet on Usenet.
--
Wes Groleau

"Statistics are like bikinis.
  Click to see the full signature.
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wrote in message

Funny how those "legends" existed LONG BEFORE the internet Jus goes to show your limited knowledge
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On 12-06-2012 09:18, Attila Iskander wrote:

Yep. I heard one of them before I was ten.
It was false then, too.
--
Wes Groleau

Don't get even — get odd!
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