Aluminum wiring issue

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Thanks Bud. See my reply to Speedy Jim.
Ed

paste
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Barry,
When you say "screw-connectors" are you referring to the side connections on the wall box devices?
I also have had to use twist connectors in ceiling mounted stuff. Used the Al/Cu rated ones of course. I was wondering though why there isn't some kind of a "terminal-block" kind of connector for Al/Cu connections. I recently installed an inline exhaust fan that came with a terminal-block connector, but I don't think it was AlCu. Don't see why it couldn't be done though, if Ideal set their mind to it.
Ed

wiring,
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Jag Man wrote:

It is not the cost of the tool but rather that the crimps are only sold to contractors who have been certified in the application. If you have not been certified by the manufacturer you cannot obtain the listed crimps that are suitable for making aluminum to copper splices. -- Tom H
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On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 22:53:02 GMT, "Jag Man"

This normally happens when copper and aluminum are in contact with each other. Causing less and less good metal to conduct electricity, and causing overheating. So don't be surprised. What you should be supprised about, wtf was that allowed to happen? There are special wirenuts, i'm thinking about ideal, that have chemicals allowing copper and aluminum wires to be twisted together. You can twist on copper pig tails so you can use copper only fixtures.

Why? Aluminim isn't against code, has the wire become so damaged it can not be salvaged?

Now this is a good idea, if you want to replace the aluminim with upgraded cables, that's a very good reason. Personally I wouldn't replace aluminim unless I really had too. But then I use electrical inspectors for my own work performed in my own house. Even when I don't have to. :)

Yes, you mentioned a possible problem. If the aluminim wire was connected incorrectly at the fixture box you might have a problem every where in the circuit. I would suggest you check that switch box for incorrect connections(ie, unprotected copper to aluminum, copper only terminals on the switch, etc).

Remember, never use what I posted or anyone as fact, always use qualified personal to do electrical work, and allows comply with NEC and local codes.
later,
tom
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I belive Ideal only makes the UL approved wire nut for connecting aluminum and copper wires.
tom
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On Tue, 19 Apr 2005 23:23:23 -0400, The Real Tom <tom @

http://www.idealindustries.com/IDEAL-EZ/products.nsf/ItemMasterLookup/p30-765?OpenDocument
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Our local power company uses a special crimp connecter to connect their aluminum drop to our copper lines. It seems as if every 4 or 5 years they lose their conductivity and have to be replaced and on one occasion the connection even burned apart. I usually notice the problem when I hear a sizzling static sound in my short-wave radio. Think I would do as one poster suggested, check the smoke alarms. RM~
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On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 22:53:02 GMT, "Jag Man"

Get yourself a whole bunch of rolls of Reynolds Wrap (aluminum foil). Run one strip from the basement to the attic on the North wall of the house. Be sure to scotch tape all splices. Run the other strip up the South wall of the house.
Connect the neutral wire to the alum foil on the South wall. Connect the hot wire to the alum foil on the North wall.
Now simply attach everything in the house to those two foils and you gots elektrizzitee.
A note of caution. Always call the fire department when you are going to turn on any appliance to warn them.
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Funny you should suggest this. I have a microwave oven on a cabinet near the stove. To protect it from the stove heat, I have a sheet of aluminum foil taped loosely to the side as a heat/splatter shield. When a thunderstorm is in the area, it is not unusual for the aluminum foil to build a charge and discharge to the stove's metal frame with a small flash & pop. In fact I've got many small pit marks on the stove where it happens. And no, I've never had a lightning hit - and I do have lightning rods on the roof. So your suggestion of using a bunch of rolls of aluminum foil should make a really big capacitor & put on a fantastic show.
Bob
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