Aluminum threshold on cement floor

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I've been asked to anchor aluminum threshold for commercial doors. About six inches wide, and runs the width of two 36 inch steel doors. One half of the threshold is loose, and needs maybe four or so anchors.
Some how, I remember some blue anchors that look a bit like drywall screws, but have really aggressive threads. Anyone know what I need for the job?
Where to find these? Lowe's? Need flat head, so as not to be a trip hazard. Can't have hex heads.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 12/24/2013 05:30 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

They are called "concrete screws"
I use them all the time and they are great. Most any H/W store will have them. (They come in either flat head or hex head)
BTW: Don;t get the ones made out of concrete though (yes another one of my stupid jokes)
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On 12/24/2013 6:57 PM, philo wrote:

Whew. Glad they are available. Are they near the lead free lead anchors?
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On 12/24/2013 06:42 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

More than likely next to the snow tires... get 'em before they melt.
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On 12/24/2013 7:46 PM, philo wrote:

I'll use them while I'm with my blow up doll, and my roller skate, and my air compressor, and my ball joint.
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Christopher A. Young
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As others have said, Tapcon is a common brand of concrete screws. If you haven't used them before, you might want to try them in a similar situation to your job before you try them in "real life".
There are 2 types. Flatheads, for which you should countersink the threshold, and hex head which will end up with the head proud of the threshold. You might not want that, unless there's a track or groove that will keep them below the surface.
One key tip: Tapcons are essentially a one shot deal. If you spin them in too fast you can strip the hole. Once you do that, you can't use that hole again unless you fill it with epoxy or something. You also usually can't loosen the fastener and tighten it again. Concrete isn't as forgiving as wood in that regard. It's basically "a screw them down tight and leave them alone" operation.
I mention all this because the fasteners will be visible. If you mess one up, you might have to drill another hole in the threshold which will also be visible.
Check out this video:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=djotP-sR4mU
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On 12/24/2013 9:47 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Score! Online video training. Best reply yet, thank you.
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DerbyDad03;3172065 Wrote: >

> in

> hole

> can't

> as

> them

No, you can take the Tapcon out, and put 2 or 3 tooth picks in the hole and drive the Tapcon back in. The toothpicks will act just like a plastic or lead anchor, pressing against and gripping the rough sides of the hole with soft wood that the Tapcon screw threads will also grip well. Clear any dust out of the hole with a pipe cleaner first, cut the toothpicks to length, and insert them pointy side up so that the screw point automatically finds it's way in between the inserted toothpicks for a uniform grip all around the screw.
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nestork


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While a toothpick might work in concrete for some period of time, I wouldn't trust it as much as I would in wood. As I'm sure you know, it is standard procedure is to use treated wood when there will be contact with concrete. Why? Moisture.
Maybe I might consider slivers of PT wood if I had to R&R a Tapcon, but I wouldn't trust a standard kitchen toothpick to last in concrete,
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On Thu, 26 Dec 2013 13:41:42 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

How about a couple of nylon tye-straps???
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Actually, that might not be a bad idea.
Of course, in my lifetime I don't recall ever having to take a Tapcon out and put it back in. Anything I've attached with a Tapcon was meant to be permanent, like a sill plate to a concrete floor, wire mesh for parging cement block, etc.
Now, I have stripped one or two while installing them, but since they were eventually going to be hidden, I simply drilled another hole nearby and tried again.
BTW.. I just found this in a FAQ at the website listed below. My assertion that Tapcons were a one shot deal was based on my experience, not on anything I had read. I'm glad I found something to substantiate my comment.
Are these cement screws removable?
Yes, they are removable from the hole in which they are installed. However, reusing the screw in the same hole is not advisable because the holding values may be decreased or non-existent.
- See more at: http://www.concretefasteners.com/anchors-fasteners/tapcon-screw/faqs.aspx#sthash.ZSan332j.dpuf
Of course, using some sort of material to improve the "holding values" might work. Luckily I've never had to try anything like that.
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On 12/26/2013 11:26 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Cut to length, for the hole? Now you've got a great idea.
I did buy some Tapcons, and two masonary bits. Looked at beeswax, but it's $5.49, so I'll try candle wax instead.
A friend loaned me an impact driver, so I can rattle the tapcons in. Job set up for sometime Friday, see how it goes.
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wrote:

My father used to use a little plastic tube-like cylinder maybe 1/4 inch diameter about 2 inches long that inserts into the existing hole. Then the screw would easily go down the plastic piece, expanding it to grip the sides. He never used anything but smooth round holes in the concrete, except for nail gun stuff.
maybe some plastic tubing would work and be more available to you.
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The most comman brand is "tap-con"

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The brand I use are called Tapcons. Pre-drill the concrete using a masonry bit of the correct size and lubricate the screws with bees wax.
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The Streets wrote:

Aaaahhh , beeswax ! Great idea , thanks . BTW Chris , when you drive these use a brand new bit in your screw gun . They turn tough and if you cam the bit outta the socket yer screwed .
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Use epoxy instead of beeswax. It lubricates on the way in, and helps prevent pullout later - - - - -.
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On 12/24/2013 11:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You can get the dual tube anchor adhesive from the industrial supply house or what I've used for big screws and bolts which it the glass capsule epoxy that you put into a cleaned out hole then install the anchor using a drill attachment that breaks the glass tube containing the epoxy and catalyst which mixes and spreads inside the hole around the anchor. The epoxy is stronger than the concrete. Hilti uses a plastic capsule but a number of manufacturers sell a dual tube system wkich uses a long disposable mixing nozzle. ^_^
http://www.unisorb.com/pdf/gc24.pdf
TDD
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On 12/24/2013 11:34 PM, Snag wrote:

Wonder where I'd get bees wax?
And, yes, the new screw driver bit is also a great idea. I've heard that thunk-thunk-thunk noise a few times.
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One of the best things to turn in tapcons is a brace with appropriate bit...plenty of leverage, lets you turn in slow and to the proper torque, That's particulatry important with a threshold because if you torque too much you are going to deform the (probably) hollow threshold (unless it has a support under it).
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