aluminum tape

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On Sun, 15 Oct 2006 20:11:29 -0700, "Eigenvector"

Ask. They have it. It's expensive and it does the job. Looks like duct tape, only it's metal.
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Eigenvector wrote:

That's your problem...look for DUCT tape.
--

dadiOH
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Duck tape is a brand of duct tape, but I don't think the name is the OP's problem. I think the problem is that he tried a half-assed search in a store instead of doing a full-assed search. It's amazing how much stuff I don't find when I don't look for it.
Not sure why googling "aluminum tape vent" didn't occur to him...
R
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wrote:

Because then I wouldn't have gotten all the remarks suggesting I was lazy.
Honestly, people post in these groups because they want to hear a little bit more than a glorified shill.
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wrote:

Oh, just for a bit of education From the Wikipedia on Duct tape
"The origins of the name "duct tape" are the subject of some disagreement. One view, popular among many Internet Q&A sites[5][6], is that older references to a different fabric product called duck tape, which the OED states perhaps was altered to create the origin of duct tape, in combination with a popular tale about WWII Army soldiers comparing the invention's waterproof qualities to that of a duck, proves that the original name of the product was, coincidentally, duck tape. This view is summarized most notably in a New York Times article by etymologist William Safire in March of 2003. The other view is a more conservative etymology, noting that documented use of the word "duct" to describe the product in question predates any documented use of the word "duck" to describe the same, by many years, and that there is no evidence supporting the WWII story or that the product got its name by altering the name of a different product.[7] This view also accepts the simpler explanation that people have just confused the effectively identical pronunciation of two similar but unrelated products through the process of elision, and the rest of the "duck" etymology is folklore or fabrication. This view was summarized most notably in a Boston Globe article by etymologist Jan Freeman, also in March of 2003."
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Eigenvector wrote:

It amazes me that people seek folkloric explanations instead of the obvious. It also amazes me that there are people willing to explain things they don't know. Luckily we have writers willing to obfuscate instead of clarify and use words like elision. .
The tape in question, duct tape, as the vast preponderance of users and manufacturers call it, is a fabric based tape. I'm sure you've heard of cotton duck fabric, well, that's where duct tape got its colorful vernacular name, (cotton) duck tape. There is only one manufacturer that is allowed to call their duct tape Duck tape as Duck is a trademarked brand.
Cotton duck

Cotton duck (from Dutch doek,"linen canvas"), also simply duck, sometimes duck cloth or duck canvas is a heavy cotton fabric. There is also linen duck, which is less often used. Duck is classified according to weight in a numerical system, with grade 1 the heaviest and grade 10 the lightest variety. Besides this, traditional names exist, which are rarely used nowadays. Duck is used in a wide range of applications, from sneakers over tents to sandbags.
R
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wrote:

Bingo! Ironically, sacks for picking cotton were made from cotton ducking.
--Andy Asberry recommends NewsGuy--
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On Sun, 15 Oct 2006 20:11:29 -0700, "Eigenvector"

imho:
You said it, it is different, duct tape dries out, seperates, and fails.
I've found only cheap HVAC guys use duct tape, and I've been yelled out in the past for even suggesting it's use. Let the DIY'ers use it. :)
later,
tom
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