Alternative to Tile in the Kitchen

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The floor covering in our kitchen is shot. My wife is not crazy about ceramic tile, plus, the subfloor would have to be removed to make room for the height of the ceramic tile.
What are modern alternatives to tile? Linoleum? Recommendations?
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Bamboo Flooring (a renewable resource)
http://www.bambooflooringhawaii.com/pic/KitchenRF.jpg
.
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Oren wrote:

Linoleum (not to be confused with vinyl), is mostly a renewable resource as well.
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Pete C. wrote:

Alsoit has so many choices; color and pattern. Some even looks like tile.
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On 1/22/2010 11:12 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

We have several vinyl samples, and they do look like tile. That's what we're going to use. Now we have to decide on the color and design.
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Some people do laminate (a.k.a. Pergo, and other brands) click-together, hardwood-looking flooring. One place to check for pricing, styles, etc. may be http://LumberLiquidators.com . Also, Home Depot, Lowes, etc.

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Vinyl is an excellent choice for a kitchen floor. It comes in many embossed patterns and colors. Do not use a wood product.
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Go visit a flooring store. There are so many materials in the past 10 years that I'd be hard pressed to say one is better than another. Sheet goods tend to be good and easy to maintain, but take a good look at alternatives and see how they fit with your needs.
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Anything that is softer than ceramic, stand on ceramic for an hour and your feet will tell you to get off of it!
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They even have glueless vinyl/lino. Can't couch for it since I've never used it. Not sure how long it's been around and if it stands the test of time.
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wrote:

Several years ago the installer brought a "tape down" product. He used double sided tape. The real estate agent was upset as she expected a glue down type flooring vinyl.
The floor was clean, but this guy put in the effort , cleaned more trash from the floor and used the tape. Outstanding job that day.
First time I seen a taped vinyl flooring.
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I like sheet vinyl. No seams (or very few, if your kitchen is large).
The kitchen is a place for utility. While it can also be attractive, the foremost consideration is cleanup.
Cindy Hamilton
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wrote:

Agreed. Kitchens have spills, even if there are no kids around. Too many people put flooring in kitchens that are not suitable for a wet environment.
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We have one-piece vinyl now for the last 10 years, still looks good, and if you spill something, or the dogs laps water out of his dish, you don't have to rush to clean/pick it up. Wouldn't consider anything that was not one-piece to cover the entire floor. Of course, if you kitchen's smallest dimension is more than 15 feet, you may be in trouble<G>
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I am following this thread with great interest. My kitchen sheet vinyl is tired, big-time. Have been looking at alternatives (price is big consideration). QUESTION: When this vinyl was put down, somewhere in the late Pleistocene, the floor layer guy that it would be "impossible" -- meaning, I guess, very difficult -- to remove it..
Can this be true? If so, is it possible to put down a new sheet vinyl floorcovering OVER the old one?
TIA
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Current common practice by low-bid installers is to cover with 1/4" luan plywood, and lay the new floor on that. Can be a pita, if doors and cabinets (and especially dishwasher openings) are not tolerant of the floor getting taller by 3/8 to 1/2 inch.
They can also skim-coat existing floor with leveling compound, but that is prone to telegraphing the pattern from the old vinyl, old seams, any nail pops. etc. Vinyl really wants to go over something smooth and hard for best results.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

Yes you can put vinyl over vinyl but it must be done right.
Option - Put down "underlayment" which is not luan and is more expensive. Screw and construction adhesive it down. Screw heads must be countersunk. Screwing pattern is important, especially at seams and wall edges. All seams and screw heads must be skim coated.
Option - Same as above only with luan.
Option - Same as above two only using ring shank nails.
Option - Scrub wash and strip of ALL dirt and wax. Cut out any loose, bubbling, peeling vinyl. What remains must be securely in tact. Skim coat (not floor leveler) to fill old pattern and bring any areas where insecure vinyl was removed up to level. Dried skimcoat can be sanded to remove imperfections.
Which option I would use depends on the floor condition. I've done all of the above except using ring shank nails. Screws are the sure thing. Depending on length, ring shank nails can be tricky if you are hand nailing.
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Thanks for detailed procedure in case I decide to go that way.
(NOTE: Original installer did put down a plywood subfloor; sorry, I did not think to ask at that distant time whether it was luan or ?)
I do not know whether it's true what installer said about my existing vinyl being so hard to remove. If I decided to lift out a section to see whether , in fact, it is so difficult to remove, how would I proceed? Would I heat the vinyl with ? to soften it? Or?
TIA for any suggestions.
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wrote:

It's glued down. Time consuming to remove. What comes off will be in small pieces. Then there is glue and irregularities left on floor. To remove & smooth, that would be a time consuming task. What is left is not a good surface for new adhesion. I would avoid this approach at all cost...personally. My guess is it's the most work resulting in the crappiest result.
The best surface is a new one. A new surface would overall require the least amout of work and mess.
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Higgs Boson | 2010-01-22 | 6:33:19 PM wrote:

Remove the vinyl with a floor scraper. Smooth the floor with a belt sander. This will take off most of the remaining adhesive. Fill any low spots.
If you're putting in tile, the thinset will fill low spots just fine.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
  Click to see the full signature.
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