All-In-One paint/wood trim

I am about to paint- I have Behr all-in-one paint. It is colored- the walls are white. However, there are quite a few patches of Easy Sand 20, sanded, and ready to go. I know the paint has primer in it. But I'm thinking this paint is made for a condo owner with walls that were in generally good shap e.. Should I prime over the patches just to be on the safe side? Which Prim er? PVA or gripper?
Also- i an priming the wood trim- I am using Kilz Complete oil based, and t hen latex semi gloss. I have read that sanding/deglossing is not necessary since the paint there now is flat. Opinions? Is it normal for primer on woo d to be able to be scraped off? Thanks.
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wrote:

I always prime over patches, or you will see dull spots. You say you have Kilz oil. You already have what you need. Use the kilz.
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Roller or spot brush?
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On Friday, January 2, 2015 10:46:33 PM UTC-5, Chris wrote:

I'd say it's very likely going to be fine without priming. I wouldn't prime, but if you want to be sure, then prime. If it doesn't look perfect to you, you could second coat that area later, while you have the paint going for another wall somewhere, just come back, hit it again. If you do prime, I'd use a roller to make sure there isn't a texture difference.
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Don't use oil paint to prime EZSand. It's not likely to soak in well, which is the whole point of primer. It will also probably "raise the grain" of drywall, which is hard to fix.
Flat walls with latex paint and patches: Spot prime the patches with wall paint before you start. Or just do two coats, which you'll probably have to do anyway. I use a latex primer when I do a large area or have drywall to paint, but for small areas adhesion not a problem. Water-base paint soaks in.
Washing: I always wipe down woodwork with mild TSP solution in very hot water. It sounds like you're talking about washing the walls. I never do that unless they're clearly sooty, greasy, etc. Latex/ acrylic paint is porous and sticks well, and people don't tend to put their hands on walls a lot, so there's no problem with adhesion there.
Kilz isn't too bad for wood priming, but you'd be better off to use a real wood primer. Simply put, quick-dry primers are handy but they don't soak in well. They're OK for spackle spots and small areas, but not so good for new wood. I like to use Benjamin Moore oil-base primer and underbody paint. It provides a nice base without raising the grain.
If you want the trim to look really nice I'd go with the emulsified oil paint: Benjamin Moore Advance is one. Sherwin Williams makes a better version called ProClassic Acrylic Alkyd. It cleans up with water but settles smooth like good oil paint. The only drawback is that it's a little bit trickier to work with than plain acrylic paint and it goes on thin. You'll need two coats over underbody; probably three coats over regular oil primer. (The BM Advance doesn't clean up as well and the coverage isn't quite as good as the SW ProClassic.)
Regular latex paints aren't bad these days for trim. They settle much better than they used to. But you can never get the same elegant sheen that oil paint offers. Acrylic/alkyd is a compromise between them. (I'm still using Pratt and Lambert Red Seal satin oil when I can get it, but where I live P&L is now gone and Red Seal can only be sold in quarts due to EPA regulations. Last summer I had a big job where I was painting 5 or 6 rooms and had a chance to try out different options, since it looks like I'll have to give up on oil paint soon. That's how I ended up with the ProClassic.)
I've only used Behr once, on a wall. It was surprisingly glossy, sticky and even tended to sag, which is unusual with water-base paint. The result was OK and covered pretty well, but personally I would never use a product like that. It's worth a few extra dollars to buy good paint. Expensive doesn't always mean good, but cheap is very unlikely to mean good. Behr is a HD brand. I don't know what's in it, but even if it seems to be good I wouldn't want to trust it in the long run.
Benjamin Moore is not what it used to be since Berkshire Hathaway took it over and the EPA got in on the action, but it's not bad. Just avoid the watery, overpriced Aura line. The Regal line is good. The newer Regal Select line is OK. Sherwin Williams is good. Pratt and Lambert is very good, but SW bought them, so it may be disappearing. Other brands may be regional and there's been a lot of consolidation in recent years, so I'm not sure what other options you might have.
I am about to paint- I have Behr all-in-one paint. It is colored- the walls are white. However, there are quite a few patches of Easy Sand 20, sanded, and ready to go. I know the paint has primer in it. But I'm thinking this paint is made for a condo owner with walls that were in generally good shape.. Should I prime over the patches just to be on the safe side? Which Primer? PVA or gripper?
Also- i an priming the wood trim- I am using Kilz Complete oil based, and then latex semi gloss. I have read that sanding/deglossing is not necessary since the paint there now is flat. Opinions? Is it normal for primer on wood to be able to be scraped off? Thanks.
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On 1/2/2015 10:27 PM, Chris wrote:

Much depends on the sheen. A flat paint will hide patches very well. As you move up to matte, eggshell, satin, semi-gloss, etc. the chances of the patches being noticed are increased.
The best way to eliminate noticed patches is a proper repair but not always easy to do. Therefore, a primer definitely helps. IMO, the Behr color primer is good and obviously you want the same color primer as the paint. I've used it in all my rooms. If you're really concerned about noticed blotches and patches, then use the Kilz on those areas. Then again, even Kilz will not completely eliminate a bad patch job. I suggest comparing on small areas if possible. One with the primer paint and the other with Kilz. Otherwise, just Kilz over it all, use the primer paint then paint it all with the Latex.
With fresh unpainted wood, sheen is irrelevant to preparation. Regardless of the sheen, the sanding on wood is to make the paint adhere. No matter what sheen you use, if it isn't sanded properly, it'll still scrap off. If one is able to scrape off primer from wood, it was poorly prepped or not prepped at all.
If painting over painted wood, then a good thorough cleaning is required, but many experts still say to lightly sand. IMO, if you plan to sand, then why bother with the cleaning. Sanding will remove the dirt and grime, though, much depends on the amount of sanding and buildup of grime.
Therefore, to answer your question, I wouldn't heed the suggestion of not sanding. At the least, I would thoroughly clean with a good degreasing soap then lightly sand before painting. I like to make sure the task is done right the first time. Repeating jobs is a PITA.
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wrote:

I wouldn't waste a roller and all the paint that gets wasted on them, if it was only a few sq. ft. of patching. Just use a brush. But of it's large areas, then a roller is faster.
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