All electric house question (YO doug)

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We've just purchased a house that's had most of the electrical wiring scavanged out of it. Also, it's a propane house, and they stole the HVAC system out of it also. I'm considering changing this house to all electric. As i've never been around an all electric house, so I'm unfamiliar as to how they're typically setup. Do they use one large panel, or two seperate ones? I have no idea (yet) how much amperage is required for the electric backup on a new heat pump system. My HVAC guy will tell me that when he bids the job. I want to start gathering pieces and parts as i will be wiring/re-wiring myself. The current panel has to be replaced regardless, due to it being a 100a FPE stab-lok. Just looking to get some preliminary ideas on what i'm up against as far as service requirements. It's only 1000 sq. ft ranch style 3 bedroom. Will go with electric hot water also, but possibly two units. We will, however, retain the propane for the range. (homey don't do electric stoves)
thanks
steve barker
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"S. Barker" wrote:

200A service is plenty, even for all electric.
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I live in NY's snow belt. We're building apartments that are all electric including an electric furnace. Our BPU superintendent stopped by today to check on things and to satisfy his curiosity about how much elect the electric furnaces were drawing. They drew 42 amps when on high. They are designed to heat a 1000 sf. apt but we are under construction so the doors aren't on and such. With the temps being warm and in the low 40s today, we were only running 1 furnace for all 8 apts. When it was real cold, we had 3 hooked up during construction. That would be 126 amps for 8000 s.f.
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You certainly need the specs on the backup heat, but for a 1000 Sq ft house barring lots of electric goodies, hot tubs, saunas,etc. a 200 amp service should be plenty

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On Thu, 10 Jan 2008 17:16:46 -0600, "S. Barker"

having it after the initial cost.
This is a very good link if you want to know more.
http://hometips.com/articles/sunset_books/complete_wiring/calculate_electricalusage022.html
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Do you get much of a winter in your location? Where is this house?
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eastern kansas

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Normally one large panel.

150A service should be adequate for a home of that size.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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DA had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/All-electric-house-question-YO-doug-280712-.htm : S. Barker wrote:

I have a fully electric 1700 sq. ft. house in the US North East. It's a 200 Amp service and the bill is between $85 (spring, fall) and $350 (coldest months) a month. I have a regular and an off-peak meters which also helps to keep the bill lower. I think better insulation and better windows would make a big difference for the winter bill. My heater is not a heat pump, just a coil which is also not very efficient.That'll be my next big project. Should also make a big difference in keeping winter bill in check.
Good luck! I think you'll like it all-electric.
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Living in NY State, there's no way in heck I'd go all electric. I know friends who lived (past tense) in an all electric house, and the ice storm of 1991 nearly froze them into ice cubes. At least have a gas stove, or a propane stove with a tank.
Check the rates, also. The one time I had all electric building for my work shop, it nearly bankrupted me.
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On Thu, 10 Jan 2008 20:51:31 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

We had an electric outage during a cold ice storm here once. I was glad to have gas logs (that would heat without electricity).

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I hear ya on the power failure situation. This house will have a wood stove also.
s

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With the price of electric, you may be using the wood stove as often as possible. My friends who used to live in all electric, put in a wood stove after the 1991 power cut, two weeks in some areas. Anyhow, they used the wood burning stove as often as possible.
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On Jan 10, 8:51pm, "Stormin Mormon"

I'm all electric in WNY down along the Southern Tier. But we have muni electric. Ha ha.
OTOH, for many (most?) people, their stoves and furnaces will kick off without electric anyway. You need it for the fans and controls. You can't have wood as primary heat, so you do need something as primary and that'll generally need electric.
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Most gas stoves, you can light the burners on top with a match.
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Thanks to all who responded. I'm comfortable now ordering breakers for the new 200A panel i already have.
s

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The wire for a 100A service will be too small for a 200A or 150A and will have to be replaced.
On Thu, 10 Jan 2008 18:52:15 -0600, "S. Barker"

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I haven't looked at the feed service yet. The meter has been pulled, and it's only about 50 feet from the house to the meter pole, so changing the cable won't be a problem.
s

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Do some comparisons of energy cost. Electric in most areas is veryexpensive compared to other fuels. Propane water may be cheaper and give faster recovery times. Check it out while the choice to change is still simple.
Go here http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/fuel_cost_comparison_calculator/
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There's more to consider than just the cost: electric water heaters don't need flues.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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