Air In Well Water


Hello,
What does it mean when there is air in your well water?
Truly
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wrote (with possible editing):

What kind of pump?
If a jet pump it can mean that you have air getting into the feedline to the well.
If a deep well pump it can mean that the well water is getting low.
--
Larry
Email to rapp at lmr dot com
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L. M. Rappaport wrote:

Hello,
Both the hot and cold water are milky at all points.
It is a new, Goulds, Hydro Pro, submersible pump.
Is a "feedline" where the water leaves the well to go into the basement, water tank?
Is this serious enough to call back the plumber?
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How long has it been doing this? I'd give it a couple of days to settle down. Getting air in a system is somewhat normal. When I change filter cartridges in my house I get air for a half hour or so.
If it persists, it may be sucking air and water for some reason, like your well is running dry.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I'd say OP definitely has an air intrusion somewhere and if this is new pump and wasn't doing it before, time to call whoever did what back.
I've pulled and replaced pump and never had more than the entrained (large) air to get out of the system when put it back in service. Sounds to me like either there is an air leak somewhere or, perhaps the new pump is of higher capacity (or not worn impellers) such that it is, as you say, sucking air. If that's the case, definitely not a good sign.
Need far more info/details, but I'd say call the pro, especially if it was work done by them.
OBTW, pressure tank/pump in the system? There'd be another entrance point...
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wrote in message

Other possibilities are the foot valve on the pump is not installed or incorrectly installed or failed. The fact that you have air in the system for more then a minute or two after the work is done leads me to believe there is a problem that was either there before the pump was changed or was created by the pump change...... Why did you decide to have the pump changed? Also, is there a check valve installed just before the bladder tank?
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jackson wrote:

Reality check. I am putting it in your reply although it pretty well is a reply to everyong in the thread.
He has a submersible pump. There is no footvalve in such a system (there is perhapes a checkvalve built into the pump though).
Being a subersible, the pump can only be sucking air if the water level drops below the pump intake, i.e., out of water.
I can see no way for air to be entering the system after the pump as any leak will be going 'out' not in.
Outgassing is a possibility but if it wasn't happening before the pump change...
I, too, want to know why he changed the pump.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

Hello,
There was a natural source of water that went dry; the well was dug; then the natural source of water returned, therefore the well was never used. I purchased the house; hooked up the well; at first use there was air; plumber said it will go away; it did go away; now it is back (about 3 or so months later; after new installation of connection; pump; tank; etc.)
Truly
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Harry wrote:

Okay. The first time you hook up any system, you have a bunch of pipes full of air. It may take a while for it to work out. Quite normal.
Your current air in the system sounds like one of two to me.
1. Low producing well that allows the intake to suck air at times. 2. Outgassing from the water. Depending on the source, outgassing can be quite a bunch.
Does the cloudy water only occur after a period of drawing water (pump sucking air) or is it there every time you turn on a tap (outgassing)?
Harry K
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Harry wrote:

...
...
Indicates the well is insufficient capacity for the pump/usage or actually going dry. Not much you can do other than perhaps drop the pump (assuming there is more hole below the installed depth and the water table is reachable), deepen the existing well (assuming there is water deeper), or cut usage or reduce pump capacity to within well capacity or live with air (which, if of much magnitude or continuous will likely shorten pump life).
All in all, sounds like you've got a real problem if need this well for other than peripheral use.
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wrote in message

I respectfully disagree. In submersable pumps there is usually some sort of check valve (ie foot valve) at/on the pump. Otherwise what would prevent the bladder tank from pushing the water out of the line back into the well every time the pump turned off? Also another reason to have another check valve installed in the hous just before the bladder tank - IMHO. If the line was draining (losing prime?) every time the pump stopped I would think that would cause air in the system. I would suggest watching the pressure gauge at the bladder tank to see if the pressure drops when no water is running. This would indicate either a leak or bad check valve. I agree it might be the pump draws more then the capacity of the well, but if it was my well I would want to check a few other things like this before I made that conclusion.
Just my 2cents.

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jackson wrote:

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we work on water wells in maryland most likely it is a problem with the check valve in the top of the pump submersible pumps will not pump air when the well draws down to the intake screen it will stop pumping water only a small amount of air could enter as soon as the water flow into the pump stops the check valve will close. the pump will not be able to prouduce enough air pressure to open it when the water in the well rises enough it will start pumping again. if this process takes too long it may cycle on the internal overload. a couple of questions i would ask the op is do you notice more air first thing in the morning than any other time of the day? has your cold water gotten warm at anytime? has the water gotten dirty at anytime?
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I saw your response to an air problom with a well and wanted to ask a question or two for my own situation.
I recently ran a lot of water out of my well. Approximately a week later, I started getting air in the lines. First it was noticeable with one toilet, then another, then some air in some of the faucets throughout the house. It is most noticeable first thing in the morning but can be heard at other times during the day. The water pressure appears to be fine and it never appeared to be low. I have an artesian well but I don't know much about them or any well for that matter.
Any ideas as to what may be causing this and what can be done to fix it?
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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Well, if you have an "Air over Water" tank then there is an "air level control" on the side of the tank what will automatically vent excess air. Usually the pressure gage is attacked to it. These do fail occasionally. You can loosen the "nut and bolt" on the side to manually vent the air. MAYBE when you put the small parts back together the valve will work properly once again. If it doesn't you might have some problems getting a replacement because "modern" installations use a diaphram type tank. You will need a BIG pipe wrench to remove the valve body as the thread is nominal 1 1/4" (which is about 2" diameter).
If you don't have an air/water tank you might have low water in the well that let your pump pick up some air. (Not much as the pump just doesn't pump "air" very well. It might get a little "froth" pass the check valve.) The temporary "cure" is the same: vent out the air. The method is different: you shut off the pump and open a faucet until the pressure drops to zero. Toward the end, it should be all air. Turn the pump back on. Repeat. If your pump is picking up a lot of air, it's time to call in a "professional." Well professionals have a lot of experience. Drillers might do 50 to 75 wells a year and "pullers" might pull 100-150 pumps or more each year. Whatever your problem is, they have seen it before. If you are going to pay to have your pump pulled you might want to consider ordering what you want rather than what the "puller" usually stocks.
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