Air hose pressure/volume question

This may not be exactly the correct group but this is where I lurk so you get my question.
I have my shop totally plumbed for air with both inside and outside connectors and it sits approximately in the middle of our rather large lot in a small community. The compressor is a 7 HP with a 60 gallon tank.
Now the question: I can reach anyplace on our lot with 200' of air hose but I am curious if I will lose any volume and/or pressure through that long of a hose. The hose is a normal 3/8" rubber air hose. I currently have 100' and everything (nailers, & even my TIP sandblaster) seems to work fine but I thought that I would ask prior to purchasing another 100'.
TIA
Don
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The amount of pressure drop will depend on the length of hose, the internal diameter of the hose, the smootheness if the inside of the hose and the amount of air consumption. Some air powered tools may have internal regulators, so cranking up the pressure may overcome the loss without hurting the tool. Or buy a larger diameter hose, that would work better. I don't have the charts, but if someone does, they will need more information as explained above.
Stretch
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If you have quick connects, check the pressure coming off your tank. Now, with THE SAME GAUGE, check the pressure at the end of the hose. There's your answer.
I don't believe there would be any appreciable loss of flow, although I am no expert. It will be nice to hear from someone who actually is in the compressor business to give us the 100% for sure answer.
In the oilfield, we would run hundreds of feet of hose, but then, we had a big Schram compressor backing it up.
Steve
Steve
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I am under the impression that the piping and hose add up the total volume. So, if you have a 60 gal tank and add a lot of piping you increase your capacity by the volume of the pipe/hose installed. You may get a gallon or more of storage in your setup. I have never experience any issues with long versus short hoses other that the weight of carrying around a long rubber hose.

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wrote:

It is likely that 200 feet of hose will half your air volume. So increase your air pressure to compensate.
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Donald Gares wrote:

I would guess the only thing that might give you a problem would be the sandblaster. Most tools would not have a problem and even the sandblaster may be OK. Get it and try it.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Hey guys, thanks for all the replies....they were appreciated.
I will probably only be using a nailer at the most extreme distance (hate to nail a 800' picket fence by hand) so I think that I will just grab the extra hose and give it a try.
Cheers,
Don
Donald Gares wrote:

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Good advise from somebody who understands what is going on.
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SteveB wrote:

That will only give you static pressure. Since you use dynamic pressure you need to measure that. You would also need a "T" at the end of the hose and measure it with the various tools connected. A sand plaster is going to have a lower dynamic reading, but a nail gun is likely to have almost no loss.

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Joseph Meehan

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It'd help if the "Good advice" was included in your post!

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nospambob wrote:

It would also help if you wouldn't top post... :)
But, in response to your comment, he (Gideon) was complimenting the previous responsder for the lucid and correct answer...
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pjm@see_my_sig_for_address.com wrote:

....
And rightly you should...what if usenet were to become a haven of accurate and even potentially useful information???? :)
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Donald,
There are extremely easy approaches to your situation.
What I suggest for you is to add one or more remote tanks to your system. You can purchase small tanks or you can make your own by using old propane tanks, freon tanks, helium tanks, etc. Obviously, you will want these tanks to have quick connect fittings. These tanks are handy for several reasons: 1) The are nice portable tanks to put in the trunk of a vehicle for emergency tire inflation. 2) Take them to the first day of basketball, soccer, football practice for the tiny tots and you are a hero as you inflate everybody's sports balls which are down to 4-5 psi. 3) They provide a buffered storage capability for remote operation when hooked up to your home compressor system.
Some friends and I use EXTREMELY tiny hoses for long runs (200' - 1000') of compressed air. The hose and the fittings are relatively inexpensive and the setup works extremely well if: 1) There is sufficient tank capacity at the business end of the system to provide reserve capacity. 2) We accept the fact that there is a recover time between tool uses.
If you are building a shed 1000' from your air compressor, then you can use 1000' of extremely small improvised air hose plus one or two improvised air tanks. This setup is not going to be as flexible as that beautiful 60 gallon tank in your garage (drool !!!), but the average nail gun or roofing nailer just isn't going to know the difference. If you are doing a huge sandblasting job 1000' from your compressor, then you are going to have to work in phases as you wait for the tanks to recover due to diminished air flow in those long runs of tiny hose. Obviously, you will be using a relatively short and full diameter standard air hose between the remote tank(s) and the air tool.
For me, this has never been a big problem. Of course, I own several compressors, including an extremely light-weight portable roof-style unit, plus several generators. So I can go remote if I need to. But, I can service my property and many of my neighbors by using dirt cheap improvised tiny diameter hose plus improvised air tanks rather than dragging around a much heavier generator and compressor.
By the way, around here I see at least 4 or 5 old-style propane tanks sitting on the curb on trash day every week. The trash collectors aren't allowed to take them and I'm doing folks a favor by picking them up. I drain off the propane into my good tanks and then put those old tanks to use for storing compressed air. And it is all free.
Good luck, Gideon
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