Air Health UV Home Air Sanitizer

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Hi Bob, hope you are having a nice day
On 20-Mar-05 At About 03:46:54, Bob Pietrangelo wrote to All Subject: Re: Air Health UV Home Air Sanitizer
I guess I should have gone more into depth on this. I wasn't putting any filter system down but it is a known fact that the least restrictive filter is a fiberglas type. now the problem is that the more restrictive the better it filters. I just think that people should know that you can easily go overboard on the type of filter and cause problems and more wear and tear on your system. it is best to ask your service tech what type of filter and he should also do a temp rise check to make sure all is ok. here is a site I found that explains a little more about filter types.
http://www.nafahq.org/residential.htm
-=> HvacTech2 <=-
.. "I bought instant water but I don't know what to add..."- s.w.
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I would like to retract my harsh reply to Stretch in this NG the other day. He is a lot more qualified about filtration than I, and after talking to him off NG, we both discussed the subject, neither was wrong, but in this instance his judgement was much more fact based and related to the subject. p.s. I still love pleats..........HAHA
--
Bob Pietrangelo
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On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 08:14:05 -0500, "Bob Pietrangelo"

I've seen many replies that were harsh. I've even had many of mine take out of context.
Thank you for the clarification.
Good Job.
Tom @ www.ChopURL.com
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

They do work, but many people don't replace the lamps as needed and more important most people don't need what they do. Sort of like selling refrigerators to the Eskimos.
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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I am the one that asked the original question and I see that this topic has generated quite a bit of discussion. I thank you for all of your input. We did buy this online and I sent one to my sister in Michigan. She bought our house there. She has a son who is very allergic to animal dander and when we left I had two cats and two dogs. My brother-in-law had the ductwork vacuumed out. I didn't think for $149 it would hurt to try. I saw it on a DIY program and it was recommended by the host of the show. He neglected to say that it is only in certain Home Depots in certain states.
Thank you all for your comments.
Amy
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On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 12:36:01 -0600, "Amy Johnson"

I know having a UV santizer, and testing it's effectiveness verses not having one, can be differecult, but after you install it, please wait a while and then repost your 'feelings' about it.
Also, I've seen the show too that you mentioned, can you reply with how 'easy' it was to install?
thx,
tom @ www.ChopURL.com

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My husband installed it in about an hour. Most of that was rounding up tools, etc. He didn't swear or ask me to help, so it must have been pretty easy.
We just moved from the Saginaw Valley in Michigan to southwest Missouri. I have asthma which has decided to kick up very badly in the past two years. The Saginaw Valley was rated 4th out of 200 in bad places to live for asthmatics. We bought a 12 year old house in Missouri and moved out of a 53 year old house in Michigan. I hope this year will yield much better asthma results.
I'll let you know how this thing works. So far, so good.
Amy
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Amy Johnson wrote:

I don't see how the UV would help with animal dander. The duct cleaning may have offered some marginal assistance.

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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It was my way of putting salve on my guilt for the house not being perfect. There is a lot of mold, mildew and pollen in that area. I hope that it helps with some of those for my nephew.
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On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 14:01:36 -0600, "Amy Johnson"

Do you have mold, mildew, and pollen inside your house?
later,
tom @ www.ChopURL.com

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The basement was moist and yes we did. And when we bought the house in Missouri, we had to have the crawl space demolded.
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On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 20:31:31 -0600, "Amy Johnson"

I don't have mold, but I noticed my basement was moist. I live about 100 feet from a creek, so I'm guessing the surounding soil stays wet. I purchased a dehumifier, now that gives me comfort and peace of mind.
I recommend you do that.
Oh, I made my house humidity worse by adding an additional r30 in my attic. Now the AC runs less freqently in the summer time. So I had to get one. :(
later,
tom

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We did use a dehumidifier and that helped. We also worked on the eave troughs, put in a new concrete driveway to slope away from the house (to the tune of $4500), and put extenders to take the water away from the house. The house is brick and was built in 1952, so it isn't as air tight as houses built later. We took up all carpet in the basement and put down that two part expoxy paint. I hope my nephew benefits from all of these efforts. My father-in-law (who built the house) had a new furnace installed with a Space Guard furnace filter. It is in still the Saginaw Valley, and in my opinion, the pollen haven.
Amy
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Okay, now I'm confused. It is impossible for pleated filters to ALWAYS be more restrictive than flat filters. It has to depend on the medium (the material used to make the filter) and how clogged with dust the filter gets. In my experince, straight filters allow a much higher volume of dust particles to "blow by" the filter because the filter does a poor job of trapping the particle with most high volume high speed fans used today with modern whole house central air conditioning systems. Respectfully, Andy

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Andy
I have tested 20 different brands/types of pleated filters and 6 or 7 brands/types of fiberglass/polyester filters. For 1" thick filters, the pleated filters have ALWAYS been more restrictive! I tested 20" x 20" x 1" filters at 800 CFM, to keep it aples to apples. The fiberglass/polyester filters varied from .075 inches water gauge to .1 inches water gauge (IWG or IWC) pressure drop. The 1" thick pleateds were from .20 IWG to .21 IWG. Typically installing 1" thick pleated filters in the average installation will drop overall air flow 10% to 20%. I measure air flow with a flow hood, hot wire annemometer and rotating vane annemometer. These are accurate, sensitive, expensive instruments. I am certified air balance technician by the National Balancing Institute. If you install a 4" to 6" thick pleated filter in the duct system, you can reduce the pressure drop significantly to about .08 IWG to .1 IWG, but that is not a do-it-yourself project. It is also not apples to apples. But, yes, the pleated filters catch a LOT more dirt. And they get dirty faster and should be replaced at least as often as fiberglass filters.
Stretch
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not.
than
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Stretch how much more restrictive is a pleated filter and why? Which size 1", 2", 4", HEPA. Which ones are you speaking of being more restrictive. How long should they last, when are they at peak performance. Is there a way to use an electrostatic without it becoming too restrictive. What is the real problem if the use of a pleated filter is too restrictive for a system. What is the surface area of filtration with a pleated, vs a non pleated. How does that extra surface arera help or hinder the filtration. How much dirt does a standard $.50 filter stop or allow to get to the coil to get either stuck in the coil or back into the air stream.
I apologize for asking so many tough but pointed question of you but you should not be downing products that are going to help people, when you show a limited amount of knowledge about filtration ,but are portraying a proffesional responce.
Pleated filters are alot healthier than any standard filter. An electrostatic is great but must be cleaned about every 3-4 weeks to reduce restrictions of air flow. I have seen (almost always) a 4" pleat as in a Honeywell or Aprilaire Media 4-6" filter laast a year. 1" good pleats should last 6 months. Now if you are having construction around, or have shedding animals these times are greatly reduced. I would never have an electronic air cleaner in my home. Unless they are cleaned every three weeks they are useless. I have installed hundreds of Media Air Cleaners in properly designed systems with proper air flow. If you are not willing to allow your contractor to do the job right, or if you deal with contractors that aren't educated enough to know how things are supposed to be you will have problems.
In terms of Ultra-violet air purification systems they are great if you are alergy prone or you have a mold, mildew, amongst a bunch of other things they destroy. The do create Ozone, but there are a couple that kill the ozone before it enters the air stream. We only use Sanuvox, and install them in the return duct before the media air cleaner. My customers rave about this set-up and have referred me to numerous other people with alergy problems. My doctor is referring custoemrs with central systems to me also.
You guys are not completely informed, and I guess this is the main way you are trying to be informed, through the usenet. There are alot more competent sources. Even on the net you can get informed, but there are idiots spewing garbage out there too.
I really apologize for coming into this thread without reading the earlier replys, I usually just read what the HVAC guys have to say. So I apologize for this long rant
--
Bob Pietrangelo
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I bought a house that had one in it. I had never heard of it before. I researched and came to the conclusion that if they worked, you would see them everywhere.
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On 21 Mar 2005 12:22:56 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com"

I think until recently, UV sanitizers were only available professionaly installed. They had to install a relay that kicks them on when the fan started to presearve the life of the bulb. The diy one can be operated 24/7 without relays, so now we can install it.
Give it time, might see it more and more in the homes.
later,
tom @ www.CarFleaMarket.com
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