Air Health UV Home Air Sanitizer

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We saw a DIY program about this. We both suffer from allergies. I just wanted to know what the consensus is.
Thanks,
Amy
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On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 13:05:49 -0600, "Amy Johnson"

Ok, I've seriously thought about doing that diy uv santizer thingee, but I run into a few problems. How is mold spores(major cause of allergies) not mold spores anymore. Sure they might be 'killed' but they are still mold spores.
Now don't get me wrong. I have no outlet by my furnace and last night I finished drilling holes to run 14# over to an outlet I nailed up. (which will later feed a wall recept, and uf to an outside box), but the box I'm wiring too now can be used later for the uv santizer. Just incase I decided to get it.
Maybe responders can explain how this santizer works on molds?
thanks,
tom @ www.Love-Calculators.com

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Amy Johnson wrote:

Limited value. I would say even less for allergies. It may kill bacteria, but dead bacteria and mold spores etc. will give you the same reaction as live ones.
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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The UV will kill the spores etc preventing them from reproducing. The effect is not immediate because the protiens in the dead spores etc cause the same allergy reactions as the live ones. UV will help in the long run especially if used in conjunction with good filters.
For bacteria it is more immediate because bacteria need to reproduce in a human host to do harm. Dead bacteria cannot do that. Filtering is the only way to help with pollen.
IMHO UV light is better used to disinfect water not air

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On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 21:08:19 GMT, "AutoTracer"

Oh I get it, you're saying that if you have limited mold, it will not spread as easily cause the spores will be killed, and thereby mimimzing how much mold you have as a whole in the house?
Right?
thx,
tom(fense rider for uv air sanitizers).

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The Real Tom wrote:

Not really. Live mold spores are going to be there. All it takes is the right environment and they will grow. I doubt if any of the home UV systems is going to reduce the live molds to enough to make any difference. They come in from the outside so you can't really hide.

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Joseph Meehan

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<< I doubt if any of the home UV systems is going to reduce the live molds to enough to make any difference. They come in from the outside so you can't really hide. >>
UV filtration systems are effective for aquarium and pond use because the water is contained. However, as you said, in a house every time a door or window opens, new spores will be entering. I guess UV air filtration might help some, and sure couldn't hurt, but I'm pretty skeptical as to whether it's worth the expense.
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I have used UV lights in systems about a dozen times with very poor results. Second wind is the best I have used, Field is the worst brand I have used. Some brands I have never used. The Second Wind was a combination media filter , UV light and photo catalytic converter, called a PCO. It worked the best. Lennox has a multi bulb PCO also. You have to replace the bulbs every year or two, the media every 6 to 12 months and the catalytic converter every 5 years. The are not cheap to install or maintain, but may be your best option. If you have a leaky house, leaky windows or leaky ducts, all will be for nothing because new mold spores will come in from outside faster than you can kill them off or filter them out. Not any easy answers out there.
Stretch
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Ive heard for areas of excessive humidity and problems present UV can help alot, best is starting with a high performance air filter, not your small 1" filters and a separate stand alone unit if needed. There are alot of poor quality UV lights out there, they are just not strong enough, like the ones at HD
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I'm not 100% sure, (only because of the multiple opinions here) but from all that I've studied, read and been taught, it seems the UVC lights installed in HVAC systems are designed essentially to 'prevent' mold from occurring at the evaporator coil, condensate pan, and surrounding area's.
Mold tends to like warm, dark, damp, organic places to grow. So as dirt collects on the coils, condensate pans, and insulation, (the organic part), add a little moisture, (from the air conditioning) keep it dark, and you get mushrooms (mold and fungus.) With the addition of UV lights, the tendency for the mold to spread, grow, or even exist is limited. (No longer dark.) Stopping the mold at the source will prevent the air conditioning system from spreading the air borne spores (how mold reproduces.)
Those people who are affected by mold are allergic to the spores.
Bacteria grows in plenty of places other than people. Bacteria (like mold) is a decomposer. Bacteria's quest to decompose cause's the release of gasses that have odors (your nose can detect odors from bacteria, like rotting chicken, or such). Those allergic to bacteria are reacting to the gasses. The only way to remove the bacteria problem again is at the source through cleaning. In HVAC, you can reduce the gasses present through the use of activated carbon filtering.
Filtering the air down to low micron levels requires the use of HEPA (high MERV) filters and the system fan to run the majority of the time. In an effort to continuously exchange the air within the conditioned space will aid the removal of contamination when the door is opened from foot traffic. Unfortunately the consumer is hard to convince to leave the fan 'on' even though the system is not heating or cooling. You (as an HVAC expert) has to convince the client the system is a "total comfort" system and the fan's operation is a integral part of cleaning the air.
Some of the newest innovations to reduce humidity is coming from the HVAC manufacturer's by the use of 'reheat' systems that reduce the humidity without cooling or heating. Hawaii, Southern US states all benefit from the use of reheat systems or "dehumidifiers."
All of this equipment is fairly expensive to purchase, install, maintain, and operate. It's up to the 'buyer' to determine though if their comfort [from the allergic reactions] is worth all the cost.
--
Zyp


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Amy, Somewhat different idea, but I use a portable room ionizer (like the one's Sharper Image sells). it significantly reduces my need to dust and vacuum. I only put it on high if I am not in the room, otherwise low. Don't sleep with them on as I have gotten headaches by forgetting to turn it off while sleeping. Also, I don't put them in any children's room. Some people think too much O3 is harmful. Besides a handful of headaches, I haven't had any resulting health issues and have been using my ionizer for about 5 years, but consult a Doctor for the professional answer. Let me know what you hear. Also, I use a disposable pleated filter in my furnace (about $4) rather than a 67 cent straight fiberglass filter. The pleats do a much better job. If you use HEPA filtration, then you are way beyond me. Other folks here have given much better answers than me on mold and bacteria issues.

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Anyone listening? "Don't sleep with them on as I have gotten headaches by forgetting to turn it off while sleeping. Also, I don't put them in any children's room. Some people think too much O3 is harmful.
http://www.epa.gov/epahome/ozone.htm
--
Zyp


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If you get headaches its is O3 at a harmful level. It may not affect your lungs today, so wait 40 yrs. Its the cumulative effect, like cigarettes
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On Sat, 19 Mar 2005 20:13:15 GMT, "1_Patriotic_Guy"

I think I missed something. Are UV lights and filters in the same category(apples to apples?)?
thx,
tom @ www.Love-Calculators.com

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The pleats are very restrictive to air flow. Ues they do a better job of filtering but the pressure drop is 2 1/2 times the pressure drop of a standard fiberglass filter. The reduced air flow can damage your furnace or AC compressor. Use them with caution
Stretch
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stretch wrote:

Some are some are not. A pleated filter provides more filter area (and to a minor extent a better design to prevent loading). The restrictiveness depends on the media used. Some are others are not.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Hi Joseph, hope you are having a nice day
On 20-Mar-05 At About 05:39:06, Joseph Meehan wrote to All Subject: Re: Air Health UV Home Air Sanitizer
JM> stretch wrote: >> The pleats are very restrictive to air flow. Ues they do a better >> job of filtering but the pressure drop is 2 1/2 times the pressure >> drop of a standard fiberglass filter. The reduced air flow can >> damage your furnace or AC compressor. Use them with caution
>> Stretch
JM> Some are some are not. A pleated filter provides more filter area JM> (and to a minor extent a better design to prevent loading). The JM> restrictiveness depends on the media used. Some are others are not.
You are wrong again sir, pleated filters are always more restrictive than fiberglass and should be used with caution.
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Hvactek2 I notice whenever J.Meehan posts you cant resist a poke at him even going so far as to make up your own BS rules to make it fit you.
Nobody mentioned crap fiberglass it was Pleated Media of the discussion.
J.Meehan is not wrong , You are HVT2, in context , products compared, and unwarranted attack. Whats a matter kitty walk through your cherios this morning.
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HvacT2 Your the first pro ive encountered recomending Fiberglass over superior large media such as April Air. I use April Air and dont need the caution you prescribe for good reason, they last a year for me. No, your info is wrong on small fiberglass, they have poor initial pass through efficiency % and poor holding capacity allowing more dirt to bypass new and old compared to quality media. I use good media without the caution you prescribe, but would use small fiberglass with fear, as they also become restrictive in short order.
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See reply to stretch, you are wrong!
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Bob Pietrangelo
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