Air Conditioner- fix or place?

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On 4/18/2015 12:13 PM, trader_4 wrote:

1) I've repeatedly said what needs to happen before anyone adds refrigerant to the system. I guess no one listens to me.
2) After I hear that my suggestion was taken, I'll comment on refrigerant charge. I've worked on several systems that actually were low.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 4/18/2015 12:13 PM, trader_4 wrote:

I already did give my hard won wisdom, but no one appears to care. Nothing to do with refrigerant, at this point.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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trader_4 posted for all of us...

No he can not! Ever
--
Tekkie *Please post a follow-up*

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On 4/20/2015 2:42 PM, Tekkie® wrote:

I don't care what you think. Mommy loves me.
She said so when I was three.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 4/16/2015 1:36 PM, trader_4 wrote:

The 2 or 2 and a half ton systems I've serviced have taken about 5 pounds. Eight may be high.
The offer sounds less and less believable.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Thu, 16 Apr 2015 10:20:30 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You can check the delta yourself. Turn on the system, let it run a while and check the air temp going into the return, compare that to the output as close to the unit as you can get. If you are getting a 15 degree or more delta,. I might not do anything. If you are just "low" after 18 years, you may not have a bad enough leak to justify evacuating the system, charging with nitrogen to test for leaks and putting in new (recycled) freon at $50 a pound. That is particularly true if he is not even sure how low it is. Find someone who will top it up, and check it again next year..
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On 4/16/2015 6:44 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

likely is very needed, and requires no freon.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Thu, 16 Apr 2015 18:44:20 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Good idea. Also, check your filter(s) to make sure they are clean. That the guy says he checked doesn't mean he did.
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Sorry, there was more to the 20 points that I didn't list above.
"Inspect electrical for exposed wires.
inspecting and testing capacitors
inspecting fan blades
inspecting service valves
measuring temperature difference
monitoring compressor for proper amp draw, volt draw and wiring connections"
Do you think on this type of "tune up" they should be able to tell whether there was a leak or not, and where it might be?
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On Thu, 16 Apr 2015 16:03:40 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If you have a decent delta and it is not icing up, you can figure out how bad the leak is by just running it another season. Being "a little low" may not really mean anything on a system that old. I would still gamble up to a pound of freon before I did anything. (But I still have a jug in the shed) ;-)
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?

If it is a pound or two low I would think it might be icing up.. If so the air flow would be very low if at all after an hour or so of run time.
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On 4/16/2015 7:23 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Considering the age of the equipment, my advice from an earlier post is more likely to be useful than this freon obsession.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 4/16/2015 7:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

it might be?

No, and no.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 7:03:47 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

They certainly can tell if it's low on R22 or not. If it's low, then it went somewhere, so it's leaking. Could be just a very slow leak at the schrader valves which costs $1 or it could be a leaking evaporator, etc that costs $1000+.
Did it ever run right? You seem to be saying that either it never cooled right or it hasn't been cooling right for a long time. If it's the latter, but it's still doing some cooling, that would suggest that it's a very slow leak. You could do what gfre suggested, get someone else to diagnose it and assuming they can't find a leak, if it needs a few pounds of R22, top it off. That should get it back to normal performance and then you can see how long it lasts. I'd make sure that you know how much it's going to cost though. Putting a few hundred into it to try to either fix it or get a couple years out of it wouldn't be a bad idea. Putting $700 or $1000 into it, that's a different story.
Also, as gfre suggested, you can measure the air temp going into the returns and coming out of the registers. Somewhere between 15 to 20F delta is typical.
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My concern is that they didn't really check out the air conditioner and do the "20 point" inspection. They said everything else was within standards, but come on, could something this old still be within standards. Nothing else on the thing needs work except for more Freon?
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On 4/17/2015 1:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

They said everything else was within standards, but come on, could something this old still be within standards. Nothing else on the thing needs work except for more Freon?

You did read my earlier posts, right?
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Thu, 16 Apr 2015 22:02:46 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

My old ac unit was 40 years old and had only had freon added once - and was still working well, when I replaced it with a newer more efficient unit.
Sometimes you can find a leak just by looking for oily trace. When the freon comes out it oftem takes a little bit of the refrigeration oil along out with it - particulatly if the leal is in the bottom "corner" of the condenser or evaporator. In auto A/C you can often locate leaks that way that don't even sho up with a "sniffer"
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I am not an air conditioner technician, however, I had a big problem with m y new AC unit in my newly built 2450 square foot home in hotter-than-hell T exas not being able to keep my home at the 72F set on the thermostat. I had about 4 technicians tell me that the unit was working fine, but when the t emperature kept creeping up approaching 80F, I called the manager of the AC company. He came out and just looked at everything, no tools involved. H e told me that an AC unit, like a performance car engine, works better if y ou can improve the way it breathes. He advised me to add an additional air return duct and filter. I did this myself and all my problems were cured. A cheap and easy fix!
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On Friday, April 17, 2015 at 9:58:34 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Texas not being able to keep my home at the 72F set on the thermostat. I h ad about 4 technicians tell me that the unit was working fine, but when the temperature kept creeping up approaching 80F, I called the manager of the AC company. He came out and just looked at everything, no tools involved. He told me that an AC unit, like a performance car engine, works better if you can improve the way it breathes. He advised me to add an additional a ir return duct and filter. I did this myself and all my problems were cure d. A cheap and easy fix!
I presume this manager was from the same company that installed it? I guess the only thing better would have been if the company put in the additional return, which is what seems right. If they put the system in a brand new house, it's supposed to work.....
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On Fri, 17 Apr 2015 07:10:59 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

A lot of that assumes that the guy installing it was competent. If this is a place where A/C is an afterthought, they may not know much about A/C design and just try to use the heat duct design.. Here in Florida, it is the other way around. They design for A/C and the heat is inefficient.. We seldom ever turn it on so that is not a problem. I think it has been 2 or 3 years since the toaster wire strips in my A/C have been hot.
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