Air condition compressor concrete pad failure

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That was my thought from the beginning. Now, having seen the photos, WAITING makes even more sense. The pad doesn't look THAT bad. I'd leave it alone.
--
:)
JR

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If the AC is from 1980, you're about due for a new one. Average life of an AC unit is 15 years.
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On Sat, 9 Sep 2006 18:43:40 -0400, "HeatMan"

first was from Louisiana, and always complaining that Baltimore was too cold. I don't think that, but I still only use the AC 3 weeks a year or less. I know age is a factor in itself, but lack of use must make a big difference too.
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South. Since you don't, that's fine.
Around here, anything over 20 years is ancient.
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You will be looking at a bunch of money to have an a/c company disconnect the unit and move it off, then reconect it. How old is the unit? I would figure out a way to do a patch job as others have suggested and wait till the unit has to be replaced. If you do have it done, and later it has to be replaced, you just wasted that money. We use precast concrete slabs, as well as some that are like fiberglass over foam. We use the precast ones where the ground is uneven and the slab has to be partially elevated with bricks or blocks, and use the others where the ground is level, or we can place the lightweight ones over an existing slab if it is sound, but not high enough to meet code. I used one of the plastic ones like Stormin mentioned when I instaled my parents unit in 1995, and it is holding up fine. Got no idea why yours is failing. If you really wanted to, you could probably raise your unit just enough to get the old slab out, level the ground under it and install a precast slab. You could get 2 pieces of angle iron long enough to extend about a foot past either side of the unit, put one flat edge under the legs with the other edge facing up and carefully raise it and block it about an inch above the slab. If you are careful the copper lines should have enough slack in them to move that much without any problems. Good luck Larry BTW, I just bought a 36x36 precast slab a couple of weeks ago. According to the counterman at the supply house, it weighed 108 lb`It cost $20.48. Of course that price was wholesale, so you may have to pay somewhat more retail, but it still should not be terribly costly.
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I'm with those suggesting doing nothing. It doesn't look that bad to me. Is there any indication that the unit is loose/moving on the base? As long as the base is stable, not moving, the unit is level, I would probably leave it alone.
If you want to fool with it, then I'd consider using some Trex decking material to completely cover the concrete. The way the unit is sitting on legs, it would be easy to slip that under it. I'd use construction adhesive to fasten the Trex to the concrete, then use screws to fasten the unit to the Trex. You might have to shorten the brackets unless there is enough give in the tubing to allow the unit to come up the thickness of the Trex.
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wrote:

leak in the pipes?
I think I'm bend-shy, because when I was 21, I twisted a copper water pipe 10 degrees, just below a faucet, and a couple months later it started to leak.
Another time, a friend had a metal shower stall out and was letting the pipes move back and forth a couple inches at 4 feet high, and one snapped, sending water all over the bathroom.
Is it 100 percent safe to lift the compressor even a half inch, that is, no risk of causing a leak?
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mm-- from looking at the OP's pictures, it looks like the lines have plenty of slack the way they are run up to the attic, so the unit could most likely be lifted up to an inch or so without much risk of damage-- IF done very carefully. Most residential a/c lines are soft copper with silver soldered joints, whereas a lot of plumbing is rigid copper with soft soldered joints. I have leveled a bunch of a/c units and(knock on wood) have yet to cause a leak. Larry
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On Sun, 10 Sep 2006 22:29:42 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (lp13-30) wrote:

That's encouraging. My AC pipes run only a foot to the wall. Do you think that would be enough space to flex also? (I don't know why I ask, since I'm still going to be too afraid to move it back two inches at the end away from the house. Someday the thing will break, and the installer can straighten it out when he replaces it.)
OTOH, sometimes I have reckless moments and I may get overwhelmed by the desire to straighten it out.
BTW, I should have said that the shower pipe that snapped was iron.
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