Air compressor question

I got my first air compressor, it's a 4 gallon "pancake style" that is fairly portable.
I tightened the fittings until there was no air leaking out, but when I leave it off overnight, all the pressure goes away by the next morning.
Is this common? If not, how long should it hold a tank of air?
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In alt.home.repair

Mix up a cup of water with a good squirt of liquid dishwashing soap and find the leaks by dobbing it on all the joints, mainly in the hose. It will leak down, and 4 gal is small but it should last longer than overnight. Are you using teflon tape on your connections?
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The word is DAUBING, not DOBBING.
daub ( P ) Pronunciation Key (dτb) v. daubed, daub·ing, daubs v. tr. To cover or smear with a soft adhesive substance such as plaster, grease, or mud. To apply paint to (a surface) with hasty or crude strokes. To apply with quick or crude strokes: daubed glue on the paper.
- Frank
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Bill wrote:

air inside it blow out all the moisture so the tank will not rust.... dont leave compressed air sit in the tank unless you want it to rust....
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Different strokes.. etc.
I have a 22 yo Craftsman compressor and I leave it plugged and turned on all the time under full pressure. I also have several section of air hose connected and running around my shop..
Everything must be tight because it is very rare that I ever hear it start if I'm not using any air..
I can't see the difference having a tank full of air at 60 psi or a tank full of air at 0 psi.. The tank is still full of air..
Now I do recommend that you open the drain valve on the bottom of the tank ever month or so to eliminate any accumulated moisture in the bottom..
--
My opinion and experience. FWIW

Steve



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My 2 cents:
I recently purchased a Campell Hausfeld 28gallon upright compressor. I leave it pumped ful of air as well (anywhere from 60-100psi). I try to remember to open the drain plug once a week. I've noticed that there is MUCH more moisture in the tank affter it being used. If I let it sit a week at 100psi in the tank, there is very little moisture that comes out. The manual recommends draining the valve after every use, but doesn't say anything about emptying all the air out.
IIt would be a big PITA to have to let 100+ PSI of air out of a 28 gallon tank. And then when I need instant pressure, I don't have it, because it takes some time to get that kind of PSI out. On a smaller portable tank, I miught be more inclined to let out the air when I'm done. That should only take a few seconds.

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The manual recommends draining the valve after every use, but doesn't say anything about emptying all the air out.
well how would you drain the valve without letting the air out???? the manual does not say shut off the electrictity when not using the compressor, but you still turn it off dont you??????
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jim wrote:

Draining the valve isn't the same as draining the tank. Open the valve until the visible moisture is gone, then close it. It should only take a moment or two.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

snipped-for-privacy@BARFcarolina.rr.com
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emptying all the air out. Key word there was 'all" the air.
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For whatever it's worth.
Interesting, I have two air compressors that I put together. One in 1986 another in 1988. They never had any moisture or water in the tanks when I checked them for the first 2 years. So I never checked them since. But I do need to rework the second unit since it will leak out the air within 6 months. I would leave the air in the tank and leave it unplugged, till I was going to use it. This way I could tell if it's leaking air. And why let it run if your not using it!
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No. You have a leak. It should hold the air indefinitely. Check the fittings again. You may need to clean them and use fresh teflon tape.
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<< I tightened the fittings until there was no air leaking out, but when I leave it off overnight, all the pressure goes away by the next morning. >>
A major source of air leakage from low cost air compressors is the pitiful pressure regulators that are supplied. The internal diaphragms are just not that functional. Any compressor will benefit from having a quality regulator in the system. One of the more cost effective is made by Milton and can be found at many box stores and auto parts outlets. HTH
Joe
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