Air compressor fittings and hose

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In anticipation that I would need to be doing some nailing and stapling I got a used air compressor.
It is a CAMPBELL HAUSFIELD 13 gallons 4 HP. Now I am trying to figure out about the fittings I need.
It seems most air tool comes in a male 1/4" push in fitting. So it seems may be the most versatile way to configure a hose is to have a hose that has a female push in fittings on both ends. One end will just connect to the tool, the other end connects to the compressor.
On the compressor I think I will thread in a male push in fittings, then it will always connect with my hose. Does that sound reasonable or is there a better way to go?
Now on to a few questions.
The threaded fittings I noticed thread seals are used. Is this basically the same thing as the teflon tape used by plumbers? I have those but not sure if they are identical. Or is it better to use pipe dope?
What size hose is best? 1/4"? 3/8"? I will have 1/4" fittings. I assume I cannot use those coiled up thin hoses? Those are for blow guns or tire inflators? I don't think those can drive a nail gun, or can they?
The guy I bought the compressor from, never drained the compressor. I read the users guide and the first thing I did was to drain the compressor. A lot of brown fluid came out. Does it mean the compressor is badly corroded? I don't know how old the unit is. The model is wl604004aj. It seems the drain screw is also partly corroded, very hard to turn.
Thanks,
MC
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the outlet. Is this a good idea? I can control the flow via the regulator what is the purpose of an additional shut off? Just insurance?
MC
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You asked several questions, soooo.......
On mine, I put a female quick connect coming out of the compressor. Then quick connects on all the hoses and tools.
The corroded drain is not a good thing.
Use plain Teflon tape.
The coily things are handy, but age quickly, crack easily if cold, and fail catastrophically, sending flying shards.
A ball ninety will let you turn off the air quickly in case you cut a hose or cut a hose AND the regulator fails.
Steve
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-snip-

or have a leaky quick-connect downstream. Close the ball valve and you can leave everything ready to go in the AM without listening to the compressor kick on all night.
Jim
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Yes, the ball valve is a good idea. Cheap insurance.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Sun, 8 Mar 2009 22:54:42 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

I agree. If a hose blows in a well insulated and weatherstripped garage, the internal pressure will blow the garage right off the foundation if you dont shut off that ball valve quickly. You dont want to be messing around with a slow regulator valve when the walls and roof of your garage are bowing outward with as much as 3 feet of flex. If the walls are tightly bolted to the concrete floor, the roof might blow right off the garage instead, and collapse the walls on you or others inside the garage.
Air compressors are dangerous, particularly when used indoors in newer buildings that are well sealed. It's far better to use them outdoors or in well ventilated buildings. Even then, beware. If a hose breaks suddenly, it can whip around and decapitate both humans and animals in a fraction of a second. Tens of thousands of men die every year from air compressor accidents.
Contact OSHA before ever using an air compressor for the first time. Before using any air powered device, always get proper training and certification. Always wear safety glasses, ear protection, and full body armour. Always keep children and pets away from air compressors when they are in use. Never plug in an air compressor until it has been inspected by a certified licensed inspector.
For further information, go to: http://www.osha.gov
Safety First !!!!
Greg F.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahmail.com wrote:

It's worse than you imagine! Actually USING a compressor in a confined space will suck all the air out of the room causing an implosion! Before that happens, however, paint can lids will pop open, jars will shatter, and the cat will have a nosebleed.
Best to open a window slightly, on the opposite side of the room from the compressor.
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There was a time when a guy in Los Angeles, when a guy in a tightly sealed garage turned on his compressor. Like you say, it sucked all the air out of the garage, and pumped it into the tank. He became disoriented, from lack of oxygen, and passed out. His wife thought there was something wrong, and tried to open the man door. The door swung out, the vacuum pressure was too great for her to overcome. She called 911, and the dispatcher told her to take a cordless drill, and drill a couple air holes in the garage door, where it's thinnest. She did, and saved her husband's life.
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On Mar 9, 4:43am, snipped-for-privacy@yahmail.com wrote:

WOW are you serious - blow garage out of the foundation? I can understand that if the hose breaks it will spin and dart around like a punctured balloon and could be hazardous...but this is not any more or less hazardous then going to a gas station and use their air pump to inflate tires right other than it's outdoors? Can it really blow the roof off?
Where would I find an inspector to check out the compressor I have?
Thanks,
MC
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It's a matter of convenience.
Turning the airflow off via the regulator can be a pain because you have to screw-screw-screw on the knob for several seconds, and mess up your regulator setting in the process. Some regulator knobs are very difficult to turn and are very hard on the wrist. The ball valve allows you to quickly shut off the air in a split second and not lose your regulator setting.
Just be sure to run the tool or plug in a blow gun to relieve the air pressure in the hose before unplugging it from the compressor. There is a lot of pressure and volume built up in that hose, and when you unplug it all that pressure escapes through the open male end. That blows all the loose crud in the area around and straight into your eyes.
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It's a matter of convenience.
Turning the airflow off via the regulator can be a pain because you have to screw-screw-screw on the knob for several seconds, and mess up your regulator setting in the process. Some regulator knobs are very difficult to turn and are very hard on the wrist. The ball valve allows you to quickly shut off the air in a split second and not lose your regulator setting.
Just be sure to run the tool or plug in a blow gun to relieve the air pressure in the hose before unplugging it from the compressor. There is a lot of pressure and volume built up in that hose, and when you unplug it all that pressure escapes through the open male end. That blows all the loose crud in the area around and straight into your eyes.
Reply:
And if you DON'T unscrew the regulator every time, the springs become compressed, and lessen in their function. Every person who welds will tell you that the instructions say to unscrew the regulator T handles EVERY time you are putting the equipment away. Regulators last longer if you don't leave them screwed down. It's just the facts, ma'am.
Steve
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Wow...lots of questions
first of all.....forget the horsepower rating.
All the oyu can bank on is the cfm number at some psi
or the amps & the volts....is this a 220v unit? becuase the very most oyu can get out of a 110v / 20 amp circuit is just a taste over 2 hp
the standard configuration is a male q/d on one end of the hose & a female q/d on the other.....otherwise, how would connect hose to additional hose.
A male "output" fitting would not be a good idea...you need a female output q/d...they're self-sealing
I have some 1/4" hose (kinda wimpy for big air consuming tools) & some 3/8" hose (kinda heavy & cumbersome)
The coiled hose, is just hose, coiled.....great for a blow gun at a machine tool but I'd never use it for construction air tools. The coil hose will drive a nail gun but it will proably drive you crazy, getting in the way & fighting you.
Air hose is jsut like natural gas, water piping or electicity ......longer runs need bigger hose (wre) to prevent pressure (voltage) drop. Short runs can do fine with smaller hose, it all depends on the tool cfm consumption
that brown liquid is rusty water...it the tank is thin, you might be in trouble...if its a decent thickness, maybe not.
cheers Bob
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wrote:

Wow...lots of questions
first of all.....forget the horsepower rating.
All the oyu can bank on is the cfm number at some psi
or the amps & the volts....is this a 220v unit? becuase the very most oyu can get out of a 110v / 20 amp circuit is just a taste over 2 hp
the standard configuration is a male q/d on one end of the hose & a female q/d on the other.....otherwise, how would connect hose to additional hose.
A male "output" fitting would not be a good idea...you need a female output q/d...they're self-sealing
I have some 1/4" hose (kinda wimpy for big air consuming tools) & some 3/8" hose (kinda heavy & cumbersome)
The coiled hose, is just hose, coiled.....great for a blow gun at a machine tool but I'd never use it for construction air tools. The coil hose will drive a nail gun but it will proably drive you crazy, getting in the way & fighting you.
Air hose is jsut like natural gas, water piping or electicity ......longer runs need bigger hose (wre) to prevent pressure (voltage) drop. Short runs can do fine with smaller hose, it all depends on the tool cfm consumption
that brown liquid is rusty water...it the tank is thin, you might be in trouble...if its a decent thickness, maybe not.
cheers Bob
================================================================== Thanks Bob...how do I know if the tank is thin?
I should have drained the tank to inspect. But I didn't. Oh well...
I understand the hose being male/female point, it makes sense. So I will keep the compressor outlet female push-in 1/4". Then make a hose one end male (to go with the compressor end) and the other end female, to be ready for male ended tools, then make another double ended male/male push fitting in case a female push in tool.
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There are two types of female fittings. The one I've seen permanently attached to tanks is spring loaded in the open position. You can connect the hose with one hand just by pushing. The one usually found on the end of a hose is spring-loaded in the closed position. You have to pull back with one hand while attaching the fitting with the other.
I've never seen a female connector on a tool. Besides, you can change them yourself. Skip the male/male unless you need it.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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I understand. However, when I go to the store to buy fittings, they don't label them differently - spring loaded in the closed position vs spring loaded in the open position. Or is there a way to tell them apart?
Thanks,
MC
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You'll just have to examine them yourself. The default-open ones will have the sliding collar moved away from the quick-connect opening. The default-closed will be next to the opening. Play with the fitting on the sample compressor at the store.
Your store may not carry the normally-open version. I've never seen it at the big-box places. I only mentioned it because you're rebuilding parts of your machine.
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I beleive the ones of which you write are called "push to connect"
MC- if you;re interested in push to connect style or learnign about air q/d's
go to www.mcmaster.com
& search on air quick disconnects.....good info & some video as well
I use & standardized on the "industrial" style fittings, made by Amflo (used to be in Santa Ana, CA until they moved back east). The most popular in SoCal are industrial & automotive styles
I'm not a fan of Milton since they seem to have their own model type designations that seem to run counter to the industrial / aerospace world.
I have used the push to connect but chose not to standardize on them (slightly more expensive) but maybe should have, since they allow one- handed connection.
about the tank wall thickness....I can tell by look & feel & sound, if it a relatively new, non-commerical unit, its most likely thin
...my tank is thin (less than 1/8"..closer to 1/16), my nieghbor's used antique unit is thick more like 3/16 or 1/4"
cheers Bob
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In anticipation that I would need to be doing some nailing and stapling I got a used air compressor.
It is a CAMPBELL HAUSFIELD 13 gallons 4 HP. Now I am trying to figure out about the fittings I need.
CY: That's a fairly large one. A HP is typically 748 watts, so 4 HP is about 3000 watts. That's about 28 amps at 110 VAC or 14 amps, at 220 VAC. You will likely need a 220 volt power line?
It seems most air tool comes in a male 1/4" push in fitting. So it seems may be the most versatile way to configure a hose is to have a hose that has a female push in fittings on both ends. One end will just connect to the tool, the other end connects to the compressor.
On the compressor I think I will thread in a male push in fittings, then it will always connect with my hose. Does that sound reasonable or is there a better way to go?
CY: Nope. The female end has the built in air valve, so the female end is always on the pressurized side.
Now on to a few questions.
The threaded fittings I noticed thread seals are used. Is this basically the same thing as the teflon tape used by plumbers? I have those but not sure if they are identical. Or is it better to use pipe dope?
CY: Good to use both. Teflon tape on the male threads, and then some rectorseal.
What size hose is best? 1/4"? 3/8"? I will have 1/4" fittings. I assume I cannot use those coiled up thin hoses? Those are for blow guns or tire inflators? I don't think those can drive a nail gun, or can they?
CY: The larger hose will carry more air, wtih less "line loss". I'd suggest to get the 3/8 hose if at all possible.
The guy I bought the compressor from, never drained the compressor. I read the users guide and the first thing I did was to drain the compressor. A lot of brown fluid came out.
CY: That's rusty water.
Does it mean the compressor is badly corroded?
CY: Maybe, who can tell.
I don't know how old the unit is. The model is wl604004aj. It seems the drain screw is also partly corroded, very hard to turn.
CY: I'd have to guess so! Some oil or WD-40 might help. Since the comressor is 4 HP, it is probably splash lubricated. Look for the oil drain plug, and drain out the old oil. Replace it with the necessary new oil. Probably ND-30 motor oil. ND stands for Non-Detergent. Will attract less water from the humidity in the air. Napa and other auto parts stores have ND-30, about the same price as the usual car type motor oil.
Thanks,
MC
CY: You're welcome.
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Thanks for the detailed reply. It helps me understand a great deal. Now to your question, it is oiless and it operates on a 15A 120V circuit, not 220V, but it's heavy!

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As the other poster said, you can get a little over two HP out of a 15/110 circuit. I ran it on a calculator, and got 2.5 HP.
My experience with a tiny oilless compressor, it runs a lot better if I put a drop or two of oil in the air intake, every year or so. I don't use mine very often.
The other writer's point is very good, teflon tape sometimes breaks off, and clogs equipment. Rectorseal #5 is great for thread sealing. Permatex #2 non hardening should also be good.
--
Christopher A. Young
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