Air Circulation in Multi-Level House

I live in a small 1980-era tri-level house. in the Denver area of Colorado. We just installed a new forced-air furnace and central A/C. There is a fairly steep (I think) temperature differntial between the upper level (contains kitchen and master bedroom) and lower level (with my office and 2nd bedroom) - perhaps as much as 10-15 degrees.
A ceiling fan in the kitchen helps, as does the fan on the furnace (it's a variable-speed fan, and the installers said to leave it running constantly and it would circulate air). Is there anything else I can do to increase circulation?
More details:
* There are air returns on all 3 levels. * There are forced-air ducts inn almost every room. They all seem to work. * It is most noticable in the afternoons, as there is no shade on the west side of the house. I try to keep blinds closed then. * It is more or less open between all 3 levels. Top level has kitchen, bath, master bedroom. Middle level has living room. Lower level has family room (used as my office), bath and 2nd bedroom. Kitchen, living room, family room are "stacked staggered", and are open along the common wall (railing).
One reason for my question is my wife would like to eliminate the ceiling fan in the kitchen, replace it with better looking lights. Aesthetically, I would like that too.
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Use natural convection forces after you've unnaturally heated or cooled the air through the air handler:
In winter, close or restrict the supply register(s) on the upper floor, and the return register on the lower floor... and in summer, close or restrict the supply register(s) on the lower floor, and the return register on the upper floor.
Hot air rises, cool air falls.
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Actually, I've tried that, there is still a significant differential. I had thought about installing some sort of more active solution, like maybe a duct from the ceiling area of the kitchen to the lower level with a fan inside. But I'm not sure this will move enough air, or be quiet enough, given the size of the area I could put a fan.
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<denverdoright-at-hotmail-dot-com> wrote in message

Who installed it? Did they do a manual D??? If not, there you go...you have air duct issues... If its what we call a Split level here, thats a common issue.
Did you only get ONE unit? Most times if its not zoned out with two, you have the exact same symptoms you describe.
If you want, I have a couple of contacts in the Springs that might drive up and give you some ideas, but they, like me, work in the trade, and might charge for the trip.

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<denverdoright-at-hotmail-dot-com> wrote in message

Not a problem... Manual D is the way we PROPERLY size ducts, to insure that enough air, at the correct volume and velocity is delivered to each room, and enough air is removed via the returns to insure your total comfort..
Manual J is used to calculate heat gain/loss of the home to properly size your unit. Manual T is used when sizing heat pumps...J is sometimes substitued. Manual N is used for commercial application sizing, But D is always used for duct sizing.

Not flaming...but its gonna cost you more long term IF a second unit is required....even if you dont put one in. What you have is a common problem with the cheaper builders out your way. Saw it all the time when I lived in Colorado Springs. Amazing that anyone, particularly the builder, would skimp on the one appliance that is asked to perform day in, day out, without trouble for years, that maintains your living enviroment.

Ugh..:)
Good luck.

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