Afraid to pull out the gas stove...


I have your basic bottom of the line 10 year old gas stove (from the town gas, not propane, dunno if it matters).
I know nothing of how these are hooked up, and I seem to remember seeing elsewhere that they are often hooked up to the gas feed via a large copper coiled loop so that the stove can be pulled out.
Question: Are there any worries about doing this that I should know about? (besides not smoking a cigar at the time) :)
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Thomas G. Marshall wrote:

Just go slow and look behind the stove every few inches to make sure there are no kinks that could break. If it is a copper coil see about having it changed to an appliance connector.
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Thomas G. Marshall wrote:

More than likely, it is connected to the gas feed with CSST - Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing - which is probably yellow in color.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Yes, there is something you should know. That's where the a shutoff for the gas is located. And don't assume there is one behind the stove before you start to pull it out. Having the appropriate wrench, if needed, to shut it off is also a good idea.
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On Apr 19, 6:38 pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Around here, there's a whole-house, gas shutoff at the meter, e.g.
http://lafd.org/equtils.htm
http://www.rd.com/familyhandyman/content/18226 /
-Jason
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According to Thomas G. Marshall


There have been changes in gas codes over the years, and without having a professional installer on hand, it's difficult to predict what you have. Even then.
Try to find the stove shut off, and shut it off before doing anything.
Make the assumption that they have _something_ that will permit you to pull the stove out far enough to disconnect it. But, pull out real slow and keep rechecking to see what it is and whether it's getting kinked/stretched.
If you're planning on disconnecting it (and/or reconnecting a new stove), I'd recommend getting an installer since you don't seem to have worked with gas before.
Disconnecting seems easy, but the end really should be capped (and you don't necessarily know what cap you need until it's apart), and properly tested for leaks. Similarly, for reconnection, you may have to change connectors around, _and_ also test for leaks.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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I would not be this stupid unless you really want a Darwin Award.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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Roger Shoaf wrote:

What if I didn't really want a Darwin Award? Would you be this stupid then?
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HeyBub said something like:

I don't understand what you're saying: Why wouldn't burning tobacco embers ignite either gas? Is it not burning hot enough to reach either flash point?
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Thomas G. Marshall said something like:

I used the wrong term here, by the way. Flashpoint is the temperature at which a flammable liquid turns to gas (and can then ignite), not specifically the temperature required for an existing gas to ignite.
In any case, without contentiousness, I do want to know what you mean.
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wrote in message

A smoldering cigarette or cigar or whatever you are smoking will usually not ignite propane, butane, or even gasoline. You can extinguish a cigarette in gasoline (although I very much recommend you don't try). However, as you draw on whatever you are smoking, the air rushing across the burning material will cause the temperature of the burning material to increase, much like what happens when you blow on glowing embers to get them hot enough to burn. Certain components of whatever you are smoking might get hot enough to ignite the gas. So don't smoke when you work around gas. One deep toke on your smoke and BOOOOOMM!
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Ook said something like:

Actually, for the record, I don't smoke. Not even tires.
No liquids burn, gasoline included. But the vapor does if there is molecular oxygen around (and an ignition or high enough temp).
But if I put a smoldering cigarette over the gas flowing out of my stove top burner, you're saying that it usually will not ignite? Huh....I'll have to try that.
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"Ook" <Ook Don't send me any freakin' spam at zootal dot com delete the Don't send me any freakin' spam> wrote in message things....
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