AFCI circuit breaker requirements


My understanding is that under the most recent National Electrical Code (NEC 2008?) AFCI circuit breakers are required for all residential circuits -- not just in bedroom circuits.
However, I just heard from one unofficial source that AFCI circuit breakers are not required under the newest NEC for kitchen and bathroom circuits because they have GFCI protected receptacles. Is that correct?
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wrote:

Yes.also the basement, crawlspaces, utility rooms and outdoors. In fact you also don't need either in any receptacles in the kitchen that don't serve the counter top.
The code says 210.12(B) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in dwelling unit family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by a listed arc-fault circuit interrupter, combination-type, installed to provide protection of the branch circuit.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Thanks. That's exactly what I was looking for. And thanks for the direct reference to the code. I was then able to look it up and go right to the correct section at: http://nfpaweb3.gvpi.net/rrserver/browser?title=/NFPASTD/7008SB .
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"Jay-T" wrote in message

Not in "wet areas" where GFCI's are required. AND some local areas modify the national electrical code. For example in Oregon, AFCI's are only required in bedrooms. And GFCI's are not required for refrigerators/freezers and sump pumps in garage/basement. These are local modifications to the national rules.
And some areas do not use the latest national electrical code.
Bottom line: Ask your local electrical inspectors office. Ask about local amendments and when to get a copy of these. Ask what year of the NEC your area is going by. NEC adoption map... http://www.schneider-electric.us/support/codes-and-standards/interactive-nec-code-adoption-map2 /
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 08:33:51 -0700, "Bill"
You do have places where both are required. If you have a wet bar in your family room you need GFCI within 6' of the sink and AFCI everywhere in that room. That will be an AFCI breaker with a GFCI receptacle.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Thanks. That's an added twist that I hadn't thought about, and definitely good to know.
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Bill wrote:

http://www.schneider-electric.us/support/codes-and-standards/interactive-nec-code-adoption-map2 /
Interesting. Thanks. And thanks for the link to the NEC adoption map. I passed it on to others who were asking about this.
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