Advice on installing sliding door closet


I am framing out an opening for a sliding closet door in my basement and had a 2 questions:
1) The sliding door track kit says the height should be 1 3/4" more than the door, which means 81 3/4". Does that take into account enough space on the bottom of the door so it doesn't hit the floor? Or am I suppose to add 1/2" or so on top of the 81 3/4".
2) The closet doors is adjacent to a sheetrock wall. Can the door just close up against the sheetrock wall, or is there suppose to be something like a 2X4 or door jamb on the side of the frame? What is usually done on the sides?
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On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 16:35:09 -0700 (PDT), Mikepier

Ypou are talking a pocket door? Follow the instructions - the clearance is provided for, and GENERALLY tou would frame out the door like any other so the door closes against wood. Any I've installed have been done that way
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Its not a pocket door, just a standard sliding closet door. The width is about 63", so I will use 2-32" hollow luan doors.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Ditto. I ave two pocket doors in the house.
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Ok, I think I got it now. I should just frame like a regular door with 4 9/16" wide door jambs on the sides so I can put molding around. I'll keep it about 2 1/2" away from the wall for molding. Thanks for the inputs.
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I take it you are not talking about a pocket door. The 1.75 inches should be for all clearances.You could lay out the parts on the floor to figure it out. Pocket door, I do not know about. Cut it more if you like and if its too much you can always install a threshold. I think that looks better anyway. Ive see them with no jamb but I like it better with the door trimmed out.
Jimmie
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In article

Normally the sliding door is installed in a wall and just runs up against the drywall jamb at each end. There should be a 2x4 directly behind the drywall, or even a double 2x4. If I read your post as stating that instead, the door will run up to a side wall, then you add a 2x4 on the side wall and cover it with drywall to make a very short wall section, i.e., 2" wide. You could just add an exposed 1x4 jamb, I guess.
--
Dennis


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Mikepier wrote:

You could butt the door against the drywall but the problem will be getting both the vertical closing line and the bottom of the door relative to the floor looking nice and neat.
If I were doing it, I'd put 2x of appropriate width on the walls at each end; I'd make 1" deep groves in each slightly wider than the thickness of the doors; I'd but a bumper in each groove. The doors will fit into these mini-pockets and you don't have to worry about the vertical alignment relative to the wall.
--

dadiOH
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On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 16:35:09 -0700 (PDT), Mikepier

Follow the instructions. They allow for a gap under the door.

It should have a jamb, preferably out of wood. You should shim the jamb for a perfect fit. Good luck.
Make sure your door finish is applied and cured. A pocket door is difficult to finish while hung.
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