Advice on cutting and repairing sheetrock wall


I have to cut a chunk of sheetrock out of a wall, approx. 2' x 5', to repair some plastic water pipes (why do people use plastic in places like this???). I'm going to replace the shower/tub valve, and replace all of the plastic with copper. This is the final stage of a repair job that I started a few weeks ago when a plastic (cpvc) pipe broke in the bathroom wall. I'm basically replacing all of the plastic with copper, and putting in new valves for the tub/shower, and toilets.
My question has to do with removing and replacing the sheetrock. I'm not sure I can remove a piece this big intact, since it crosses a stud and is screwed to the stud in a dozen places. Should I just hack it out of the wall, or should I take the time to find and remove the screws so that I can remove it intact?
If I take the time and trouble to remove it intact, I can replace it with minimal finishing work. If I replace it, I have to redo the texture that is on it so that it matches the rest of the wall. Any advice from those of you who have done this before?
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On Sat, 06 Feb 2010 18:57:50 -0600, Zootal

Either way, you have to texture and finish the repair. That size I would rip it out and put a new piece in. It seems easier to me.
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Zootal wrote:

If you have extra sheetrock laying around, cutting the outside and then ripping it out will be fastest. But, if you use a strong magnet to find the screws, you can just scrape off the putty over them and back them out, and save the piece without much difficulty. The biggest problem is cutting along the center of the studs so you can re-screw both side when you are done in either case.
I use a magnet taken from the inside of an old 5 1/4" computer harddrive to find screws/nails. It'll stick in place over them if you want.
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Bob F wrote:

ended up looking like crap, from the screws blowing out the cut raw edge of the drywall. Now, instead, I flush-cut as tight as I can on the side of the stud where it needs to be opened, and screw (not nail) blocks against the stud, to catch the edge of the patch when it gets reinstalled. That allows a proper margin between screw and edge of drywall, and a nice straight and tight seam to patch.
But then again, nobody will ever pay me for my drywall skills- it takes me a day to do what a pro can do in an hour. And you can still tell a pro didn't do it. :^(
-- aem sends...
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-snip-

Second that.

One day!? You're fast. I futz around with about 10 coats before I'm happy with it- then I paint it, cry for a minute, and forget it.
Jim
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All that work can be avoided if you simply use a jig saw with a shortened blade to just cut the drywall thickness. I have center cut for drywall patches for years this way. Preparing a new patch first and using it to mark the opening makes the job a breeze if the cut out section cannot be reused for some reason. If a stud to stud patch might be subjected to some stress, then the usual backing means are advised.
Joe
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On Sat, 06 Feb 2010 18:57:50 -0600, Zootal

Plan on refinishing the whole wall.
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On Sat, 06 Feb 2010 21:20:06 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Depends on how well one contains the damage.
I've seen a fast set texture ( 20 Min.) cover a ceiling patch near the size of the OP. Taped up clear plastic to avoid over spray (ceiling tent).
By the time the hopper is cleaned (do it fast), the ceiling is ready for paint. Think containment.
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I'm thinking that anyone who is asking the questions being asked is not at a level of skill and knowledge that going to be able to match the texture.
If he wants an invisible repair, he's looking at the whole wall, not a patch.
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Yes...just rip and tear....use a utility knife and steel square to make your cuts straight and corners 90 degrees...... I just completed this job ...if you have a spot where you want to match a piece of drywall to another piece that does not have a stud backing, just slide a 2X4 on its side through the hole and screw it to the good drywall leaving half of the 2x4 exposed to screw the new piece to it on the inside... then you have something to secure your patch to.... Jim
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Ditto to what Jim said...Getting the texture to match will be your biggest challange...You will have to scrap a few inches of texture off he old wall as well so you can apply mud tape..What texture is it ???
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wrote:

A sharp utility knife, level, square, and score through the paper. A nice clean cut, prevents the paper from tearing texture away when ripped out. Tape and mud will cover the cut.
Yep? The texture challenge.
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Zootal wrote the following:

Here's how I have done it. Saving the cutout piece and requiring minimum work. Cut the piece out cleanly between the studs using a sheetrock saw or utility knife, do not cut down the middle of the studs. Don't worry about having no nailers to put it back for now. After doing your pipe repair, screw some 1 by ? to the sides of the open studs as 'nailers'. Do not use nails as the hammering might result in nail pops in the sheetrock. Glue some pieces of 1 x ?, or pieces of spare sheetrock, across the backside of the sheetrock between the studs on the top and bottom of the hole. Leave an inch or more of the 'nailer' exposed in the hole I use regular carpenter glue. Clamp until dry. Glue or screw your original sheetrock piece to the nailers you put in.Gluing will eliminate having to spackle screw heads. Put a piece of plywood or other flat stock that will cover the whole patch against the wall and brace it for a while until the glue dries. A half hour is sufficient. Fill the cracks with spackle around the hole
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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