Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug to washing machine plug

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Your setup will work as you describe. The Nec prohibits using a 20 amp receptacle on a 30 amp circuit. Provided that the motor has built in overcurrent protection, I would install a 30 amp dryer cord set directly on the compressor
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longer a receptacle but part of the compressor, and that portion of the code is no longer applicable.
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On 7/25/2010 1:06 AM, Elmo wrote:

I'm suspecting that out of all these replies, NONE are correct. What i suspect is that you have a 20a plug on a 120V compressor and you just don't have any 20a 120v outlets in your house. Better look a little closer at everything before you feed that unit 240v.
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volt. It is entirely probable that the OP is looking at a 20 amp 120 volt plug and not a 20 amp 240 volt plug, which are very similar looking
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 09:39:13 -0400, RBM wrote:

It was my fault for not explaining clearly.
The plug on the compressor is a NEMA 6-20P (not a NEMA 5-20P); but I do agree that's a great point to doublecheck.
http://www.jkem.com/pictures/NEMA%20Non-Locking%20Plugs.gif
Here's also what the plate says: "240V 15 Amp Sears Craftsman model 919.176940".
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your suspicion is wrong.
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When you're dealing with amateurs, there are many ifs. With the similarities between nema 20 amp 120 and 240 devices, it's difficult to determine what he bought, or thought he bought, however as the string progressed, it became clear that he does indeed have a 240 volt machine. Had you followed the progression, you may have noticed this as well.
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 08:30:42 -0500, Steve Barker

blare is crosswise, not 2 - right? That COULD BE a NEMA 5-20 plug. oR IT COULD BE A 6-20. BOTH crosswise would be a 6-15.
WHEN YOU HOLD THE PLUG WITH THE PINS FACING YOU AND THE "U" GROUND DOWN, WHICH SIDE HAS THE "ROTATED" BLADE?? Rotated blade on the right os a 5-20 - 115 volt 20 amp. (nominal) Rotated blade on the left is a 6-20 - 230 volt 20 amp (nominal).
If it is a Nema 6-20, go ahead you are OK (and I think you DID say it was a 6-20R that you were using - which would not let a 5-20P fit)
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 01:04:05 -0700, Smitty Two wrote:

You know, I bought it that damn Sears Craftsman compressor on a whim in a sale in the 80's. It was (on sale), about 350 or 400 bucks.
Then, when I brought the huge thing home, I realized I didn't have an outlet for it, so I just let it sit for a year or so. Then I moved, and didn't have an outlet for it, so I let it sit for a few years. Finally I moved to a place that had the outlet, and I used it every six months or so to blow up the kids toys. I moved again, and guess what, no outlet.
Funny thing is that I've seen Sears compressors on sale over and over and over and over again for, guess what, just about 350 or 400 bucks. They never changed prices in decades. Amazing.
In hind sight, I never should have bought it as I barely used it due to the cord and the lack of needs.
However, I still have it. And I actually want to blow up a kids toy and then figured I'd plug the NEMA 6-20P into an adaptor consisting of a NEMA 6-20R and a NEMA10-30P and then connect to the NEMA10-30R fused by a 30-amp circuit for my 20-amp compressor.
I was just asking advice, specifically: a) How do I know that I'm NOT on a sub panel? b) Did I pick the correct ground/neutral?
Is there anything else I didn't think of (before I plug it in)?
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But I bet they cheapened it and now is made in China, or at least major parts of it
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 10:08:51 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I just googled my 30-year-old Sears Craftsman model 919.176940 and, as expected, couldn't find it for sale new anymore to check the prices.
But, used, it's 60 bucks! http://www.propertyroom.com/ItemDetails.aspx?lt99498
Because of this NEMA 6-20P plug, I've almost never used the 350 or 400 dollar compressor that I bought "because it was on sale" thirty years ago when I was just a kid.
It looks like I can still get parts for it at http://www.searspartsdirect.com
But no manual for the 20-gallon 125psi air compressor seems to exist on the net.
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 13:32:33 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

using the "neutral" - it is simply a "safety ground" - and YES, you did pick the right neutral (actually, ground)
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On 7/25/2010 1:06 AM, Elmo wrote:

does it look like this:
http://tinyurl.com/2dd6t2h
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 08:35:44 -0500, Steve Barker wrote:

:)
I do appreciate the double check (as that's what this thread is all about!).
Check twice, plug in once! :)
You show what appears to be a NEMA 5-20P; I have the NEMA 6-20P. The difference is (looking at the plug head on with the ground up), my sidewise blade is on the right whereas that plug's sidewise blade is on the left.
http://www.jkem.com/pictures/NEMA%20Non-Locking%20Plugs.gif
I've had the compressor for 30 years and barely used it because of this damn plug. If I can give any advice to a young 30 year old kid buying his first compressor, it would be to get a 110V smaller one!
BTW, the plate on the wheeled tank says: Sears Craftsman model 919.176940 240 volts 15 amps
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That's good advice if you move every couple years. But, if you're in the same place for year, the larger compressor is good.
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On 7/25/2010 1:06 AM, Elmo wrote:

Here's a better comparison, scroll down to the 20a section. It seems it could be a 120v OR a 240v depending on which side the sideways blade is on.
http://www.frentzandsons.com/Hardware%20References/plugandreceptacleconfiguratio.htm
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 08:38:16 -0500, Steve Barker wrote:

http://www.frentzandsons.com/Hardware%20References/plugandreceptacleconfiguratio.htm I like YOUR reference better than mine:
http://www.jkem.com/pictures/NEMA%20Non-Locking%20Plugs.gif
Because yours answers one of my questions, which is to doublecheck which is the green ground wire in the NEMA 6-20P (g) to mate with the white ground/neutral in the NEMA 10-30R (w) via the NEMA 6-20R-to-NEMA 10-30P adapter.
Your chart has little W's and G's and "X" and "Y" for the hot black wires.
I presume the "w" stands for white, does it not?
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Elmo wrote: ...

As noted elsewhere, you'd be better served to go to 20A breaker/plug and junk the adapter, though...

Strictly speaking, it's "neutral"; but conventional (USA, anyway) wiring is white for neutral, yes.
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On 7/25/2010 9:26 AM, Elmo wrote:

yes, that's correct
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Elmo wrote:

Jesus Christ, with all this advice you will be lucky if you don't burn the house down and put the lights out in the whole neighborhood. Just go to Home Depot and get a receptacle that fits the plug. Turn off the breakers and remove the old 30 amp receptacle and install the new 20 amp one. The "hot" wires go on the outside screws they should be colored and the ground/neutral on the middle one white if it was done correctly, might be bare if someone took a short cut. Flip the breakers back on and there should be 115 volts between each of the outside holes to neutral/ground holes and 220 volts from outside hole to outside hole. Plug the thing in and turn it on and get that basket ball aired up. Working air compressors are just real handy to have around, I use mine for lots of things, great for blowing out a dusty old computer, adjusting the pressure in the car tires, gobs of uses.
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