Advantages of the metric system

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I needed to rip some Trex decking into narrow strips to replace the wooden slats in a "park" bench we have on our front porch. I was tired of having to replace the painted wood slats every few years as it is exposed to the w eather.
After trying for the better part of an hour to figure out how many equal-si zed slats I could get from a particular width of plank, including the scrap caused by the width of the cutting blade, I was calculating things in 16th s and 32nds of an inch and not coming out even. I got out my metric ruler and solved the problem in a matter of a few minutes. I don't know why I di dn't think of that after the first few minutes of English measurements. Ho pefully I will have learned my lesson.
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2013 18:57:28 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"

Good grief, just use 16ths (or 32nds, if you need the resolution) and stick with it. There is nothing magic about the number 10, unless you have to use your fingers to count.
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On Fri, 04 Oct 2013 22:13:00 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

The problem with using english numbers on wood products is they are increasingly being made in metric sizes That is why that, except for specialty cabinet material, 1/2" plywood is now 15/32" ... or 12MM
Your handy dandy 2x4 is not exactly 1 1/2" x 3 1/2" anymore. it is 32mmx95mm
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On Sat, 05 Oct 2013 02:59:27 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

So what? Use 1/32nds, if you must. Sheets are still 48" x 96". That's usually the more important measurement. If the thickness matters, it has to be measured and it varies quite a lot. :-( If you need a tight fit (dados, etc.), it has to be measured and fit.

It's good you measure framing to the hundredth millimeter but most of us do not. 1/16th inch is good enough for most.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

But then they can't call it a tubafor.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 10/05/2013 11:34 AM, willshak wrote:

What's a tubafor?
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On Sat, 05 Oct 2013 11:44:48 -0400, Straight Mann

Oompah, Oompah, Oompah.
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On 10/5/2013 12:43 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

The Oktoberfest needs mo beer.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 10/5/13 10:44 AM, Straight Mann wrote:

To keep the accordion player in line.
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We're not making any headway.
What's a headway?
Oh, about 8 pounds.
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On 10/5/2013 3:19 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Updoc? What's updoc?
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 10/5/2013 11:44 AM, Straight Mann wrote:

One size less than a tubasix. Mostly used for framing walls. Some places cheap out, and use a tubatree for walls. Trailer homes, for example.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 10/5/2013 1:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Um, could it be called a three by nine? A 3.5cm X 9.5cm could also be called, affectionately, a threesie ninesie o_O
TDD
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Yes! Metric is very much easier in almost every respect... wish the US had bit the bullet and completely converted eons ago.
My only complaint is that the Celsius degree is a tad too big (a degree C = 1.8F), but I'll gladly deal with that.
One trick for toning down the math dealing when forced to deal with imperial units is to convert all the fractions to to their decimal equivalents, do the math with a calculator, then convert what ever result/s you need back to the closest suitable fraction with a decimal equivalent chart.
Such charts are easy to find & download. Here's one that has metric equivalents and tap die info as well... there are thousands of these things available...
http://www.imperialsupplies.com/pdf/I_DrillSizeDecimalEquivalent&TapDrill Chart.pdf
Erik
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The way to switch is to just start teaching Metric in school. Forget about teaching conversions. Most measures can be used without needing to know the English equivalent. Anytime you need to know the exact conversion, Google it.
The English system made sense when you are dealing with a few people. Just take a pail of milk and divide it in half. Take a measure of grain and divide it in half. But if you have to do that for more than a few people, the math gets hard.
I can remember trying to lay out a floor plan where the engineer used 3/16 inch = 1 foot. I had to keep one of these in my tool box. http://goo.gl/KUgL7x I kept one of these in my tool box in case I ever met the architect responsible. http://goo.gl/xW76XK
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Agree.

The other problem, is, too many Americans (Eng) have no clue of the difference between volume and weight. I can't tell you the number of times this has come up on rec.food.cooking, when ppl jes do not know the difference between fl oz and wt oz. Jes this morning I ran across a baking recipe on King Arthur Mills website. It gave a bread recipe in ounces for both flour and water, but didn't specify what measure the water was in, fluid or weight. Fortunately, it had a radio button that instantly converted the recipe to grams. It was weight for both.
If you get any higher education and take any science/eng majors, you WILL learn metric. If not, yer pretty much screwed and gotta learn it on yer own. Not good mojo.
nb
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No, you stated that particular problem backward. The problem there is that *you* don't know something that most other Americans who cook *do* know, namely, that for cooking purposes, it doesn't matter at all whether you measure 'x' ounces of water by volume or by weight, because they're almost exactly the same.
To be precise: One quart of water has a volume of 32 fluid ounces or 946 cubic centimeters. 946 cc of water has a mass of 946 grams. One pound (16 ounces weight) is 453.6 grams, so 946 cc of water weighs 946 / 453.6 = 2.08 pounds = 33.37 ounces weight.
Now divide that into 32 fluid ounces volume, and you get -- drum roll, please -- 1 fluid ounce of water weighs 0.96 ounces.
That's more than close enough for cooking. Nobody cares, because it doesn't matter. The ignorance on display here is yours, not everyone else's.
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On Sat, 5 Oct 2013 23:44:23 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

My wife is a long time chef, so I asked her how she dealt with recipe measurements. No measurement that she has used is metric. It's pretty simple with weight vs volume. Doesn't matter if it's dry or liquid. If the recipe says teaspoon, cup, pint, quart, gallon that's the measure. Volume. If the recipe says ounces, pounds, it goes on the scale. Weight. She often weighs flour, rice, etc, and very rarely weighs fluids. In thousands of recipes she can only remember weighing a fluid a couple times. Only one she remembers was vinegar. But you're right that is sometimes doesn't matter. She said she takes shortcuts with well known recipes. Like using a scoop she knows contains close to 2 lbs of rice. Never touches the scale.
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On Saturday, October 5, 2013 4:44:23 PM UTC-7, Doug Miller wrote:

And how close does an ounce of milk come to being "not important". It weighs more than water you know.
Harry K
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Not enough to make a difference. A kitchen is not a chemistry lab.
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