Advantages Of Drywall For Fire Resistance

Drywall fire resistance is a topic that's often overlooked by people who are evaluating different building materials. Did you know that drywall is a phenomenal passive form of fire resistance that can ultimately save your life? This isn't something that gets talked about too much, but it really makes sense to know more about drywall fire resistance.
The reason why drywall is considered a so-called "passive fire protection" material has a lot to do with what's actually in drywall. Drywall fire resistance derives its meaning because of what drywall is made of. As you may or may not know, drywall is typically made of gypsum. Well, as it turns out, gypsum contains water. It's true! This water is composed of hydrates that have been crystallized. What does this mean from a drywall fire resistance standpoint?
When the drywall is subjected to heat or fire, the water crystals found in the drywall are vaporized. This dramatically slows down the process through which heat is transferred. This is one of the key ways that drywall fire resistance works. Okay, so what does this mean from a practical standpoint?
Let's say there are two rooms, separated by fire-resistance rated drywall. For the purpose of this example, imagine that a fire is ignited in one of the rooms. As a result of the fact that the drywall is separating both rooms, it is safe to assume that the fire will not spread as quickly as it otherwise would if the fire resistance rated drywall were not in place. This is essentially how drywall fire resistance works.
Something else to keep in mind when thinking about drywall fire resistance is that in addition to containing water crystals, gypsum typically also contains noncombustible inorganic material that is naturally flame retardant. This is yet another factor in explaining drywall fire resistance. The reason why this is so important to point out is because it's not just the water crystals that create a reliable barrier against heat and fire -- it is also these noncombustible inorganic materials. Are you starting to get a better understanding of how drywall fire resistance works? Good! Let's move on.
Needless to say, we live in a world where the cost of a particular building material cannot be ignored. Therefore, it is natural to wonder whether or not the advantages of drywall fire resistance is outweighed by cost considerations. In short, will you have to pay an arm and a leg to get the drywall fire resistance that you're seeking?
The great news is that drywall is very affordably priced. Therefore, you really do owe it to yourself to seriously consider whether or not your building project can be served by having fire resistance rated drywall. The simple fact of the matter is that this type of drywall fire resistance is not only incredibly effective, but it also fits very comfortably within virtually any budget. This is especially true when you compare the costs of drywall fire resistance to some of the other building materials that exist which also provide some degree of fire protection and resistance.
You ultimately owe it to yourself to spend the time necessary getting to know more about drywall fire resistance. You'll be pleasantly surprised by how affordable it can be to use this in your construction.
------------------------------------- www.howtodrywall.co (__) (oo) /-------/ / | || * ||----|| ~~ ~~
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

And "water crystals"?
Does he mean ice?
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Umm... No...
There are many chemicals which capture water molecules and hold them within the crystal matrix of the chemical...
These compounds are called hydrates...
A quickly accessible example of this concept is on the Wikipedia page for Hydrate:
Anhydrous Cobalt(II) Chloride CoCl2 (a fine blue powder)
Cobalt(II) Chloride Hexahydrate CoCl2 6H2O (a red crystallized powder)
Is the same chemical hydrated...
~~ Evan
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Only fire-rated drywall can be depended on for any fire protection. The rest of this spam is pure BS.
In typed:

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Twayne wrote:

Ordinary 1/2" drywall has a fire retardant rating of thirty minutes. "Fire-rated" drywall (Type "X") is 5/8" thick, contains fibers to resist crumbling, and adds another 30 minutes to the rating.
In sum, ordinary 1/2" drywall IS a 30-minute fire barrier. Mostly. You can extend this to an hour by doubling up on the sheets.

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Smitty Two wrote:

Firewalls for interior rooms usually don't make sense. There are too many paths for the fire - ducts, doors, etc. Firewalls are most effective in isolating the house from an attached garage and protecting your computer from trojans.
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Hmm, never thought of Trojans as being a firewall before, but it makes sense.
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So what the spammer is saying is, my house should have walls? Wow, what a concept.
My apartment (built in 1923) had a fire- Fire Dept said that had it been drywall instead of plaster the fire would've spread faster- apparently plaster is better than drywall.
I mean, it's not like we're building walls out of plywood...
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On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 03:00:21 +0000, bluntman001 wrote:

Not if the fire is electrical and starts behind the drywall. Just watched a house fire 100 feet away from mine on Wed. Electrical short in the wiring is suspected. Flames traveled up into the roof. I don't think the house is a total loss since the FD was called at 4:10pm and arrive at 4:15 (real close to the FD here). At one point flames came out of one window and melted some siding. I know the owner, kids played together since grade school, I walked inside. Front door and windows ok. Left side windows ok. Fire started in the rear right bedroom. Heavy water/smoke damage. Don't think the roof was compromised much but there was heavy smoke coming from the attic vents. The FD wouldn't let anyone get close enough until the were gone. Took 2 hours. I'm sorry but in this case drywall didn't do anything but impeded the FD. They had to axe some of it out to get to the burning wall behind it. and cut a hole in the ceiling to get into the crawlspace attic to water down some smoldering wood.
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Umm...
A structure fire needs to be overhauled like that before the Fire Department releases the building back to its owner/person-in-charge...
A little bit of damage to a wall or ceiling to make sure there are no hot spots left inside is better than having the smoldering embers of a fire come back to life hours later when there is more oxygen...
~~ Evan
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