Advancements in Hot Melt Glue Guns?

I bought this glue gun about 10 years ago and have used it about one every couple of weeks since.
http://img161.imageshack.us/img161/5462/gluegunp6221756ll8.jpg
I don't figure there have been any technical advancements in this simplistic concept, but I thought I'd ask.
So, have there been any technical improvements in hot melt glue guns in the last few years?
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Depends on what you mean by a "few" years.
"They" have lower temperature glue (and low temperature glue guns). They also have glue that "works" in both regular (high temperature) and low temperature glue guns.
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and some stick glues adhere better than the usual "clear" craft stuff.
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Jim Yanik
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jim evans wrote:

Well that looks a lot newer than mine, and mine still works. You certainly have not used it much if it still looks like that.
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Joseph Meehan

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I have at times wanted to get one of these, but didn't figure there would be much use for it. Pray tell, what is it that you use it every couple weeks for? Thanks, Bob-tx
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wrote:

It's such diverse things any illustration would be almost unique.
Yesterday I used it to reattach the ear cushion on a Plantronics telephone headset.
The most extensive use I've made of it was reupholstering dining room table chair seats. The seats were made of such hard wood no staple gun I had would drive a staple into it. So I attached the upholstery material with a glue gun -- not the one in the picture, but a small one I got from a $1 barrel. I may not make a strong bond but it attached the fabric to the wood so well I couldn't pull them apart. I've used it to glue cloth to cloth in several applications.
Last week I was building a roughly wood project that required several small strips of wood be attached. I tacked them in place with hot glue. Later another piece clamped them in place securely, but it would have been next to impossible to hold all these loose pieces in place what trying to position and screw down the larger piece.
Last week I also glued a tiny piece of shoe molding back that had come loose.
I used it a few weeks ago to fill a gap to prevent water getting between a plank and a post on my deck and inducing rot. I didn't have any clear caulk. Waiting for caulk to cure would have slowed me down anyway.
Here are some examples: http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/Materials/MaterialsPDF.aspx?id (92
I tack all kinds of things together with it that don't need to be super strong. But, it's pretty strong, and it bonds well to most things (wood, fabric, leather, metal, plastic, ceramic and more), and it sets quickly.
One negative is it has some thickness, even if the objects are pushed together forcefully. So if the two surfaces must go together flush, use glue. But the thickness is quite small, so in almost all cases it won't matter.
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Thanks, very interesting. Bob-tx
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As cited by one person there are glue guns that run at different temperatures with the advantage of lower temperature guns being their safety and use on temperature sensative substrates. There are also glue guns available that use hot melt moisture curing urethane adhesives that have excellent adhesion and bond performance.
My adhesive R&D company has a novel glue stick with a 10 minute working time that we have under test at a few places. It's tack free when it ultimately sets up. It is novel in that it can be applied to one substrate and it can be mated to another substrate several mintues later and still wet-out to form a bond. The advantage is the ability to use a glue gun for bonding large panels where there is a tendency for the first part of a long molten bead to setup before the end of the bead is layed down. Another advantage is the safety of being able to apply molten adhesive on one substrate, let it cool, and then safely mate to another substrate for people working in crafts, etc.
Tom www.adherentlabs.com

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