Adjust door latch - help!

Our office shop door is not latching automatically when it closes. Now we have to push the door in order for it to latch. Somehow the latch is a lot tighter than before. Is it possible to adjust it easily?
I have uploaded some pictures showing the door, latch and strike plate: http://www.flickr.com/photos/54230006@N07/sets/72157624900943843 /
Thanks Den
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By the looks of it, that top Philips head screw is scraping on the other door (paint appears to be scraped off) -- if you can tighten it a bit then try that. You can likely also try to replace it with a smaller headed screw to see if the problem goes away. Check that the hinges are on tight, and that they are not bent. Try taking the latch apart and cleaning that as well in case something's stuck in there.
You could try removing it, but I'm not really sure what it's holding... Check that the door closer thingy (forgot the technical term -- someone here will correct me...) is at the same tension as before (is it easier to open the door now than it used to be?) It could be that it was not installed correctly, and that the temperature has changed the size of the opening, causing problems (extra friction when closing) You could have something stuck in the latch (is it hard to press in?) if so, take it apart and clean it.
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The screw head is actually not brushing against the door. So it is not causing the issue. I do notice that the latch is stiffer than before. It used to be a lot easier to retract. The door closer thing seems to be the same as before. If I take the latch apart, what should I look for?
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spray the parts sticking out of the door liberally with WD 40 or silicone (preferred). You can buy either or both at any auto supply store. Also spray into the keyhole and any other place the straw will reach. Operate the key and handle, repeat the spraying.
That being a commercial lock I would suggest taking it apart to be a mistake if you have never done it before. I really think the lubrication will solve your problem. I repeat the silicone is the better choice and will last longer.
--
Colbyt
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0526053/in/set-721576249...
Should I use WD40 or a lubricant? I heard WD40 is not a lub.
Thanks
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020526053/in/set-721576249...
re: 'I heard WD40 is not a lub"
Uh-oh. Here we go again!
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Aristotle and Confucious both say WD is not a lubricant. So there!
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Christopher A. Young
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020526053/in/set-721576249...
Silicone spray lubricant, as suggested by Colbyt.
Good luck.
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Silicone, or teflon is good. WD dries out after a while. Plan on spending about $4 for a spray can of silicone. The buck and a half stuff from Walmart is worse than useless.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Sure. As the Yiddishi mama said to the doctor after he told her that her suggestion of an enema wouldn't work because "the patient is dead!"
"It can't hurt."
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I agree -- don't disassemble the lock / latch, and use a silicone spray or WD40 on the mechanism. One more step - get some paraffin or hard paste wax and put it on the latch and strike plate. It's amazing what just a little of this will do to make a door close easier. (Don't worry about this being a "short term" fix -- I had paraffin on hand for use with wood screws and used this same procedure on a recalcitrant garage entry door. Before the work the door would bounce back rather than latch; afterwards it slides shut as though there was no friction at all on the latch. This was 3 years ago and it's still just as smooth.)
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This is a variation on an Adams Rite. These are complicated to begin with, and taking them apart is often a good money maker for locksmiths such as myself. A good dose of good quality silicone should help. Hint: Open the door. Push the rounded latch in. Spray UP into the lock, through the opening at the edge of the door. The tapered opening you just made by pushing the latch in.
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Give me your address, leave the door unlatched so I can see the problem in action and I'll stop over sometime very late tonight to fix it.
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People on this group are so, so nice.
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Call a locksmith to disassemble the lock and lubricate it properly with grease on the inside of the lock case...
Spraying any type of lube on the outer surfaces of the latch will only be at best a temporary solution...
The locksmith may find that one of the internal springs of the latch has become dislodged or is broken...
You can also adjust the "latch speed" on the door closer to use more force to close the door...
Your particular problem can be caused by: poor alignment of the door in the frame, a tired door closer which is getting ready to give out, or an issue with the latch itself...
You have ruled out door alignment as an issue as shown by your pics, so your problem is being caused by some combination of the other two...
P.S. WD-40 is not a permanent lubricant, sure it will help for about 24 hours, but after that it is mostly evaporated and will do nothing to help keep the innards in a lock case lubed... In fact it may very well dislodge gobs of dirty grease with grit on it and make the problems worse...
Taking the lock case apart to properly clean it and then lubricate it with grease as it was done at the Adams Rite factory when the unit was new is what is called for here, not blindly spraying magical solvents and water displacement chemicals in from the gaps around the latch...
~~ Evan
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The door closer seems OK. I tried to push the latch in by hand and it does seem a little tight. It used to retract a lot smoother. If we have to replace the latch, where can I purchase such a latch? I don't believe Home Depot carries the commercial stuff, does it? As the picture shows, there is a word 'GEM' on the strike plate.
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These things are seriously complicated. I'd suggest if replacement becomes necessary. Call local (to you) locksmiths. Ask if they have experience in Adams Rite deadlatches.
I'd be happy to do the replacement. Buck a mile from Rochester, NY plus labor and parts. And lodging.
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