Adhesive Reccomendation Please?


SWMBO and I were visiting family graves at a nearby cemetary today (It's a Jewish tradition to pay such visits the week before the Jewish new year begins.)
The oval ceramic tile with her grandmother's photo on it had fallen out of its recess in her granite tombstone and fortunately I found it in the grass alongside the stone.
Whatever had been holding it in place for about 60 years finally gave up and let go. The remains of it in the recess are frangible and feel like some sort of "plaster".
The back surface of the oval ceramic tile is unglazed and the surface it will be attached to is smooth granite.
The "This to That" website isn't very helpfull, they don't mention "stone" and their references to ceramic refer to broken dishes and the like.
http://www.thistothat.com /
I'm thinking some type of epoxy would probably work best, but I'm open to suggestions.
Thanks guys,
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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Jeff why not contact a granite memorial co. and see what they recommend, you'll have it from the top.
On 9/24/2011 8:30 PM, jeff_wisnia wrote:

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On 9/24/2011 9:37 PM, jimmy wrote:

Agree with calling the monument company, but I would also ask the cemetery sexton or business office, if it has one. They may have a regular guy in place that takes care of minor upkeep like that. I'd think any of the modern construction adhesive, like outdoor-rated liquid nails, or maybe the stuff the big-box sells for keeping the capstones from sliding around on retaining walls, would work.
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On Sat, 24 Sep 2011 20:30:40 -0400, jeff_wisnia

I bet that was plumber's putty!

Prep both surfaces well (scratch up the granite good) and use something like PC-7 (glass- or aluminum-filled epoxy), buttered nice and thick and completely covering the bonding surfaces without air pockets. It would be really good if you could take a portable vacuum chamber with you to de-air the epoxy after mixing.
--
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On Sat, 24 Sep 2011 20:30:40 -0400, jeff_wisnia

I would use epoxy paste (the two part clay like stuff you knead together). That way it won't run out before it sets and will be a good gap filler. You want this solid so water can't get behind it, freeze and pop it out I like to prime the surface of something like this with a thinner liquid epoxy carefully brushed into each rough surface before putting the paste on to get a good bond. Use blue tape under the hole you are working on and plastic taped to the stone so if you do get a drip it won't stain the stone.
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jeff_wisnia wrote:

Silicone
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A Portland cement based product such as used to secure towel racks (and TP holders) in tile walls is likely most compatible with what was used in the first place.
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On 9/24/2011 8:30 PM, jeff_wisnia wrote:

care) on the grave site, I would think that the cemetery would reinstall it for you.
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jeff_wisnia wrote:

Is it possible to physically mount the object, say with bronze pins into an epoxy-filled hole. Same technique as used in the Big Dig to mount ceiling panels - and we all know how successful that was.
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wrote:

Any common two part slow cure epoxy will work just fine, assuming commonsense surface preparation. The preferred surface cleaner for epoxy for years has been acetone available at any box store paint department. The epoxy stone/concrete panels in the Boston tunnel applied that way are still doing fine. Common masking tape will work with epoxies since the non adhesive side has a mold release coating.
Joe
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I admit to not reading all the replies so pardon me if I repeat.
I feel pretty sure this is something you want to do right. In the absence of a better suggestion, I would use the glue that comes in a caulk tube that is made for stone wall cap installations. My neighbor had some step stones glued down a few years back and it has held up well to foot traffic. In your situation, I think it would outlive you.
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or Liquid Nails construction adhesive.
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Jim Yanik
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I've had tremendous success with Pheno-Seal Adhesive calking (Home Depot/Lowes). Works on and with just about anything MLD

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On Sat, 24 Sep 2011 20:30:40 -0400, jeff_wisnia

JB Weld. Available at Home Depot and just about everywhere. It's a two part adhesive so you'd have to mix it on site. Practice on something at home to get the feel of it, clean up both sides to be adhered, mix a batch, then apply. It will last longer than any of us will.
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On 10/02/2011 09:13 AM, DFBonnett wrote:

That would be my first thought, but apropos of my last post, I had excellent luck gluing two pieces of floor tile together with Loctite brand 5-minute heavy duty epoxy.
NB: it really doesn't set up in 5 minutes; it just becomes unworkable after 5 minutes, so you need to jig the two pieces together somehow. The same goes for JB-weld, but that product doesn't even advertise itself as fast setting.
nate
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wrote:

Duct tape should hold it in place for the requisite cure time.
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wrote:

probably tile grout.

JB-Weld is RUNNY,on a vertical surface like a headstone,you'll have drips. it also cures slower in cooler weather. I would not recommend it in this application.

I'd use Liquid Nails construction adhesive. simple and easy,no mixing. it's a strong bond to most materials,weather-resistant. or you could use contact cement,it sets fast once the two pieces are mated. also simple and easy.
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wrote:

It would be runny only if you apply it too thick. YMMV
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On 10/16/2011 08:48 AM, DFBonnett wrote:

Or PC-7 is essentially a stiffer version of JB-weld.
nate
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On 9/24/2011 7:30 PM, jeff_wisnia wrote: ...

...
Haven't read all the other suggestions but didn't see what I'd go with--a clear or black silicone adhesive. One of the automotive trim or window ones will work perfectly for the purpose.
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