Adhesive Question ?

Hello,
Have an older wooden chair with slats in the back. Some have worked loose.
Irrespective of what type aof glue I use, the glue will have to fill a 1/16 or so space, as the slats cannot be forced into any closer position.
Do I want Gorilla glue which I think I read is a polyurethane, and will fill us small gaps ?
Or, an epoxy ?
Or, a hot melt adhesive, perhaps ?
BTW: do hot melt adhesives set up really/totally hard, or only to a "semi-hard" state ?
Or,... ?
Thanks, Bob
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On 12/3/2015 1:47 PM, Bob wrote:

Elmer's wood glue.
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On 12/3/2015 12:04 PM, Mr. Emann wrote:

Elmer's plus some toothpicks or similar.
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On 12/3/2015 2:41 PM, Bennett wrote:

Elmer's glue works great for wood...however it needs to be used with wood that does not already have glue on it as the wood must absorb it...and it also needs to be clamped.
I recently used Gorilla glue for the first time and found it to be less than satisfactory.
What I do is drill a small hole and countersink...use a wood or drywall screw then cover over the hole with stained wax designed for the purpose.
There might be a better way to do this, but doggone it nothing I've ever repaired that way ever came apart again/
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philo posted for all of us...

You are screwy... Don't get screwed. One plugged guy...
--
Tekkie

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In typed:

I thought the same thing about Gorilla Glue when I had a similar situation. Basically, it didn't work well at all. The glue does foam up and expand but it didn't seem very strong and didn't hold up well. I had even used wood shims to make the joints tight first, but the Gorilla Glue just didn't work well.
My guess is to try using wood shims to make the joints tight. And then maybe try using this:
LOCTITE Power Grab Heavy Duty Clear Construction Adhesive Model #: 1589156
It goes on white but dries clear. And, if I am not mistaken, it stay just a little flexible rather than brittle which may make it hold better in your application.
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.. a photo or two would really help. .. so many different styles of chair construction. Are you wishing to bond slats into rails ? .. or filling space between slats .. ? Some of these olden chairs had a little hidden brad to hold the slats .. the slats were floating .. for expansion / contraction .. jt
--- ---
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On 12/3/2015 1:47 PM, Bob wrote:

http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId 90206
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On 12/3/2015 2:47 PM, Bob wrote:

My Dad spent about 50 years gluing chairs. He's been dead for two years, not having found the answer. Or, maybe he did and neglected to tell me before his death. I wish you better success on your quest. Sorry, that sounded depressing. Didn't mean to.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 12/3/2015 1:47 PM, Bob wrote:

Those advising that you don't want to glue glue to glue<g> as well as those saying you don't use glue to fill the void are correct. In either instance the glue may hold for the short term but that's only if you're lucky.
Hidden screw(s), as suggested, might work depending upon what the piece actually looks like. I'm thinking of a mortise/tenon joint in this case and would suggest cleaning out the joints and then fattening up the tenon: scrape off the glue present, reglue thin pieces of wood to fatten it up and then reform the tenon to closer tolerance THEN reglue the joint.
PITA? Yep but it will give you much better results.
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On Thursday, December 3, 2015 at 7:00:55 PM UTC-5, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffalo_buffalo_Buffalo_buffalo_buffalo_buffalo_Buffalo_buffalo

A decent epoxy mixed with some filler may do the trick. Notching/gouging the surfaces to give the epoxy something to key into would help.

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It depends what you mean by slats. If it's a ladder-back chair and the horizontal pieces are part of the structure, they'd have to be glued, at the very least the top one.
If there is a structure and these are additional, they may be meant to be loose. They may have been unglued all these years, but maybe a coat of varnish held them in place. The coating broke and now they are floating, but that doesn't mean they should be glued. It depends.
A common design of wooden folding chair is like this, but folding is only one kind.

It doesn't matter. With old work, you'll never get it to the place it needs to be. You say only some have worked loose so I assume you're not planning to disassemble.

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| Have an older wooden chair with slats in the back. | Some have worked loose. | | Irrespective of what type aof glue I use, the glue will have to fill a | 1/16 or so space, as the slats cannot be forced into any closer position. |
I find yellow wood glue is the best, but it does depend on clean surfaces and tight contact. when there are gaps I like to use 5 minute epoxy. But I'm not sure that anything will last a long time when you're using the glue to fill gaps.
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