Additional return duct addition cost

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I had a HVAC contractor come over and evaluate the loud noise we get from o ur vent in our living room (built in 05). He says the original contractor under spec'd the size of all the return vents in the house causing us to he ar the blower through the vent (The 16x20 vent could suck a piece of cardbo ard down it there is that much pressure).
His solution is to add another floor return vent across the living room. S o he will cut a hole in the main return line at the furnace and run a flexi ble line about 12 feet and cut a hole in the floor and add a vent.
Quote is $1250. To me that seems somewhat high as I can't imagine the part s will cost more than $250 and the job (to my mind) can't be more than 4 ho urs.
Should I get a second quote or does that quote seem rational?
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wrote:

Sounds insane from here, and I'd shoot sny HVAC guy who ever installed 12 feet of flex line in my house.
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On Sunday, June 28, 2015 at 5:31:18 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

m our vent in our living room (built in 05). He says the original contract or under spec'd the size of all the return vents in the house causing us to hear the blower through the vent (The 16x20 vent could suck a piece of car dboard down it there is that much pressure).

So he will cut a hole in the main return line at the furnace and run a fl exible line about 12 feet and cut a hole in the floor and add a vent.

arts will cost more than $250 and the job (to my mind) can't be more than 4 hours.

Well the quote says "Ductwork to be field measured and fabricated with flex ductwork connections for sound"
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wrote:

That sounds like hard ductwork with flexible isolation joints to stop noise transmission. Now the $1200 is starting to sound a little more sensible - still high in my opinion - but not as bad.
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Clare I suggest to you do some research, in California it is standard for flex duct work
wrote in message wrote:

Sounds insane from here, and I'd shoot sny HVAC guy who ever installed 12 feet of flex line in my house.
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Mabee I'd shoot myself before I lived in California too???
Is the OP in California??
Flex duct is higher restriction and noisier than standard solid ductwork. It also appears the rest of the system is "solid" because he is cutting a hole in the "main return line at the furnace".
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On Tuesday, June 30, 2015 at 3:14:06 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

In CT, the main duct work is solid rectangular, the offshoots are the flexible type.
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On Tuesday, June 30, 2015 at 3:14:06 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It does have higher restriction, exactly how much IDK. But that can be made a non-issue by correctly sizing it. Noisier, I strongly doubt. I've seen it used in many new houses, and there is no noise. If anything, you'd think the nature of it's construction would tend to absorb noise. And it sure doesn't have the bang noise that aluminum duct work can have when the blower starts up.
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Why not just do it yourself? There's no part of that job that's highly skilled. Just dirty and tedious.
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On Sunday, June 28, 2015 at 4:59:55 PM UTC-4, noname wrote:

our vent in our living room (built in 05). He says the original contracto r under spec'd the size of all the return vents in the house causing us to hear the blower through the vent (The 16x20 vent could suck a piece of card board down it there is that much pressure).

So he will cut a hole in the main return line at the furnace and run a fle xible line about 12 feet and cut a hole in the floor and add a vent.

rts will cost more than $250 and the job (to my mind) can't be more than 4 hours.

yeah dont get ripped off
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On Sunday, June 28, 2015 at 6:04:29 PM UTC-4, bob haller wrote:

om our vent in our living room (built in 05). He says the original contrac tor under spec'd the size of all the return vents in the house causing us t o hear the blower through the vent (The 16x20 vent could suck a piece of ca rdboard down it there is that much pressure).

. So he will cut a hole in the main return line at the furnace and run a f lexible line about 12 feet and cut a hole in the floor and add a vent.

parts will cost more than $250 and the job (to my mind) can't be more than 4 hours.

I'd do it but cutting into the main plenum seems like a bitch not even sure what tool I would use. Everything is very accessible literally a straight run.
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On 6/28/2015 6:12 PM, noname wrote:

like a bitch not even sure what tool I would use. Everything is very accessible literally a straight run.

I'd get a second and third quotes. Sounds a bit high.
You'd use a drill, step bit, and then red and green tin shears. I've done a bit of heating and AC work.
When I was working, plenum was supply air. Boot is for return air.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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Actually I learned from the company that I worked for, to always get three quotes, as I did quite a bit of purchasing. Unless one company looks like a cheater or somehow shady, the procedure is not to buy from the lowest bidder nor from the highest bidder, usually the middle price is the most accurate. If one gives you doubts, try a forth quote, but it should be unnecessary.
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| Actually I learned from the company that I worked for, to always get three | quotes, as I did quite a bit of purchasing. Unless one company looks like a | cheater or somehow shady, the procedure is not to buy from the lowest bidder | nor from the highest bidder, usually the middle price is the most accurate. | If one gives you doubts, try a forth quote, but it should be unnecessary. |
That's standard advice. To some extent it makes sense. On the other hand, I won't bid at all in such a situation. I have a lot of regular customers and prefer to work by reference. If someone's getting 3 bids that's often a sign that they already have a preferred contractor but just want to make sure his price is OK. At best, I'm going to spend my time for a 1 in 3 chance of getting a job for someone with whom it's not a personal relationship. That's not worth it to me. As long as I have enough work to get by I won't even consider bidding.
Another problem with that approach is that with most jobs it's not easy to know exactly what each contractor will do, because it's often not easy to know exactly what a job well done will entail.
I wouldn't say that one shouldn't ever get 3 bids. In some cases that might be necessary in order to get a sense of the landscape. But having a rule of getting 3 bids really means that you have no relationships with contractors who you trust, and that you don't expect any of them to be trustworthy. You have no hesitation about wasting their time in order to "get yours". That's really not a very good way to operate. Much better to ask friends and find someone who they've worked with and trust. Then you won't have to make uninformed decisions about whether the price is fair.
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On 6/29/2015 10:30 PM, Mayayana wrote:

The problem for homeowners is they often have no clue and get names from the Yellow Pages. You do have to be cautious.
If you have good reliable contractors all you need is a quick "about" price to see if it is in budget and go if it is. The good guys will be fair in charging as they want the long term relationship, repeat business and references to others for the future. If I do look in the Yellow Pages, I look at the full page ads and make a note NOT to call them.
I recently had both bathrooms completely remodeled, down to the walls. The tile guy was recommended to me and did a great job with tile and did some other work just to help out. When done, I actuallyh paid him $200 more than he asked and was well worth it.
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On 06/28/2015 03:59 PM, noname wrote:

Do it yourself and pocket the $1000.
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I don't see how an additional air return is going to make the noise from the furnace any quieter. You could put an isolating section of duct in the current plenum if it is conducted noise from the furnace.
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On 6/29/2015 8:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Depends on what the noise is. If it is sucking hard through to small a duct you can increase the sound of the moving air as it passes over the return grates. Adding additional vents decreases the velocity.
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On Monday, June 29, 2015 at 9:43:48 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

+1 But I was wondering if that's the real source of the noise. Which is another reason to get some additional quotes. That price sounds high to me. But it's also summer and all the HVAC guys probably have all the work they need. Might get a better price off season.
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On 6/29/2015 8:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Some times when furnace is starving for return air, it can be louder.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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