adding outlet in basement

Should I be adding a metal outlet box on a cinder block wall or is a plastic box acceptable? I'm running 14 gauge, 3 conductor copper NM wire and the outlet is to be used for a freezer.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If the wall is dry I would use metal so it not subject to damage. Ideally the freezer should go on a SEPERATE NON GFCI circuit for max dependability
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I always use metal ones. The plastic ones are mostly just for penny pinching contractors.
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wrote:

Why non GFCI, especially considering that if the freezer fails, the ice will melt and it will be wet?
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For surface mount I always use metal. I suggest that you use 12 gauge cable for your freezer instead of 14. Your compressor will thank you with a greater life span.
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On 27 Jun 2006 09:03:53 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Use a metal box and 12 gauge wire. Use conduit or a metal racetrack along the cinder block wall. Purchase the box, racetrack, clips, screws at the same time. You will need to use the special blue concrete screws and a specific concrete bit size for the pilot hole. All basement circuits should have a GFCI in the first box of every circuit. Fourteen gauge is primarily for lighting.
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wrote:

There is an exception to the basement GFCI requirement with regards to certain equipment such as refrigerators and sump pumps. You can install a "Single" receptacle (Not a duplex receptacle) to be used solely for said equipment. Article 210.8(A)(5) Exception #2. You don't want the GFCI tripping and having all of the food ruined or the basement flooded.
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You * DO NOT* want a GFI on a refrigerator or freezer !!!! Place this appliance on a separate breaker and do nto use it for anything else. Be sure to ground the outlet properly, and be sure the ground is not broken off on the appliance plug, if it is, replace the plug.
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On Tue, 27 Jun 2006 17:53:56 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

You are going to have to lose that thinking. The exceptions to the GFCI rules are becoming fewer and fewer. The laundry went away in 2005. A properly working refrigerator should not trip a GFCI. It is common that old ones develop shorts in the compressor that trip a GFCI but that is a fault, not normal operation.
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But is must be on a separate circuit. (I don't see the need for GFCI that way though). If it shares a circuit and a toaster trips the GFCI it may be hours before anyone notices it.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

With the current, no pun intended, state of wire prices I would check the nameplate rating on the fridge. Use that as your guide for wire sizing. A dedicated 15A (14awg wire) is usually more than enough for a freezer unless it is an industrial sized unit.
Don't believe the hype about the unit lasting longer if you over size the wire and/or circuit breaker. If you follow the name plate rating and size your circuit accordingly you will be fine. I can't imagine a standard fridge or freezer needing more than the dedicated 15A your running. Definitely not more than a 20A (12awg wire). Againa, this is only if you don't have an industrial freezer.
I recommend several ways to run the wire: 1). Nail a 2x4 to the wall and run flexible metal conduit to the panel and down the wall. 2). use EMT piping 3). Use ENT Piping 4). Metal Wiremold is nice. 5). Nail a 2x4 to the wall and run just the NM-C
Depending on how you do it it, these are all NEC approved options.
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