Adding new circuit to a panel.

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<snip story>
Years ago in an EE lab my lab partner was working on the 120 VAC power section of our project. All of a sudden, I hear BANG, my partner jumps out of his seat, and the entire bench goes dead. Turned out the guy had INTENTIONALLY placed a penny between the bare 120V leads. The current had blown two divots in the penny before tripping the breaker. "I thought it would just warm up the penny a little." he murmured.
Come to think of it, I didn't see him around the EE department much after that.
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I found an outlet miswired that way when I moved into this house. Maybe someone thought it didn't matter. That outlet was next to a bathroom sink, and I was replacing it with a GFCI anyway.

--
16 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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chocolatemalt wrote:

I've tried to follow the "One arm behind my back" adage when working around dangerous voltages, and I'm still around, so I guess it works. I don't think I've ever gotten a shock through my chest, but I've had some pretty good ones through one hand.
The "shock" I've never forgotten was received when I was doing TV repair as a kid and was schlepping a 19" B&W TV chassis down a flight of stairs from a customer's second floor apartment. I'd forgotten to discharge the multi KV high voltage stored in the capacitance of the CRT. Somehow, part of me got zapped by that voltage and the chassis flew out of my arms and down the stairs, with the CRT imploding en route. The boss had to buy the customer a new TV, and after that experience I always treated CRTs like they were running chainsaws. <G>
But, I started playing with electricity back in the era when electronics were all vacuum toob stuff, where ac and dc voltages in the 150 to 1000 volt range abounded. Things got quite a bit "safer" when solid state circuits took over. Nowadays sticking your fingers into "live" stuff is more likely to damage the equipment (through static electric discharges) than hurt you.
Thanks for the mammaries...
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Hmmm, don't know about 440V but I use to check 120V with my two right hand fingers. I don't do it any more. Tony
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What ?? Like are we talking rocket science here?
A little education via the public library and half a brain in the head should be all that's needed for something like that.
-Felder
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I found this link. Installing A Circuit Breaker
Thanks all Dick

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That depends on your skill level, and where you live. The simple fact th at you're asking on a world wide news group suggests you don't have the skill.
If it were me, I woulda just run the circuit and not bothered to ask.
My advice: Hire an electrician.
--

Christopher A. Young
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On Fri, 09 Dec 2005 00:51:44 GMT, "Platebanger"

Buy the "wiring 123" book at home depot, read the entire thing, Check with your local town hall about where, how, and if you should get a permit, and how much it will cost, and then check back if you have any more questions.
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