Adding Insulation during winter months

I did an addition and now that the plumbing is done, trying to get the walls up. As part of the addition, I have a crawl space and two storeys above it.
Water leaks into the crawl space and lately its been better. Because this added part is not heated, there is condensation and the humidity from crawl space does not help.
I want to get the walls up and am worried that if I put the insulation on and put the walls up, will have mold problems. The walls seem to be wet.
Other than just running the dehumidifier all the time and heat, is there some other alternative one can suggest or is this the best method?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Where are you located , what will happen this spring and summmer with water leaking in when its the wet season- all spring and summer. Condensation is at the coldest area, insulation will stop it if its not the coldest area. I think you have a big problem with water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am located in Southern NH. I was wondering may be I should just get the temperature up there to about 60. That should prevent condensation.
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Slain wrote:

Mold require continual dampness.
If your goal is to eventually remove the moisture, don't worry about transient mold.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Right, but in the future, after I put up the insulation and the drywall, would the moisture inside have any place to escape? If, yes during the summer months, then I can gladly go ahead.
I was thinking may be I should just warm up the place for 2-3 days , the put insulation and drywall on. Would that help?
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Slain wrote:

The moisture with either escape - in which case you're golden, or the cavity is hermetically sealed - in which case you're also golden.
Warming it up will increase the moisture level (warm air holds more water vapor than cold air).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Slain" wrote "HeyBub" wrote:
Hi Slain!

When you say 'water leaks' do you mean water from the sides comming in? If so, you need to grade the woutside better. This usually involves digging down and pouring a cement footer. How deep and wide, will depend on the code in your area as well as how deep the crawlspace is. I believe it's supposed to go about 1 foot deeper than the bottom of the crawlspace?

Walls along the crawlspace right? Footer most likely. If there are no pipes/electrial etc along there, you can dig this out yourself but we contracted ours out. Suprisingly, it didnt cost that much.

Both are fix-gaps and not really suitable for long term damp control.
You need a vapor barrier along the top of the crawlspace then seal the sides down underground with a proper footer. You *may* depening on the lay of the land, need some landscaping or retainer. On our footer, its raised about 3 inches then a decorative tile (faux brick) is on it with makes a nice ledge for container plants along the back side where we needed that.

Heybub is right.

For condensation moisture, yes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

FIRST you MUST solve the water leaks into the crawlspace!!
Or you will be wasting your time and money.
sure there is less water now, everything is frozen.
but what happens in the spring rain season?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.