adding a shutoff valve


I want to add a shutoff valve to an existing 3/4 inch copper water line, using solder fittings. If I cut into the line and create a space large enough for the valve, will there be enough flex in the piple for me to fit the valve in, or do I have to use a union or some other type of fitting? Thanks, Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No one but a person on the site can tell if there is any play in the line.
You can use a "repair" coupling in conjunction with a short piece of pipe and your valve to add play to a line where there is none. Repair couplings are bigger than normal and do not have a stop so they can slide over the pipe and then return to the proper position. Pencil marks on the cleaned copper can help with the alignment.
Unions work also.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit www.househomerepair.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eric Gelman wrote:

We can't see your basement from here. It may or may not have enough flex, depending on how long the run is, how pipe is fastened or wedged, and how long the runs are past the first elbow in each direction. Grab the pipe and try to move it, before you cut. Copper is generally more forgiving than old galvanized would be, but there is still a slight risk of causing problems elsewhere anytime you flex old pipe runs. Eyeball the whole run with a flashlight and your fingers, looking for green spots and such that can indicate minute leaks and weak spots.
I need to do the same thing in my basement, to add a tee for the icemaker, to replace the vampire tap valve that I am scared to touch. One of these days....
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mfrencher had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/adding-a-shutoff-valve-393333-.htm :
Eric Gelman wrote:

------------------------------------- Beauty of copper is the options it gives you. Cut it where it works best you. Sometimes Ill even take out to a 90 if ones close (solves the flex problem). I agree with using repair couplings if needed (I never have one when I need it). If I can I like to sweat the valve on my pipe sections at the truck and then sweat the pipe section in w/the valve on it at the couplers or fittings as they sweat fast and easy in close quarters and valves dont. Mainly with new guys I notice a tendency to think small and cramped when for a few extra feet of pipe they can work out in the open. Keep in mind you have to get the torch in there to
Marco
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eric Gelman wrote:

quick answer - "it depends."
You can buy sweat fittings without dimples in the middle so they can be slipped completely over a pipe. if you find your pipes are constrained, this is what they're used for - make a cut in the pipe, brighten it up, then you can just butt the cut ends together and slide the fitting over the cut and sweat as usual.
I'd buy a short length of 3/4" pipe just to reduce prep time, then you only have to really clean up two cut ends instead of four.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eric Gelman wrote:

Solder a stub of copper pipe in each end of the valve first. Then you don't need any play at all to solder the assembly in place using "repair couplings". (just a normal coupling without a stop in the middle -- be careful to center it)
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
We can't see it from here, but very likely your piple has enough flex. Copper piple is rather forgiving. Ball valve or gate valve is good. Globe valve has too much resistance to water.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Maybe, every situation is different. Generally the more length in the pipe, the greater the flex. You may get more leeway removing a support, etc. My last resort is using a sleave coupling, but it is an option often used in tight places.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.