Adding a cast iron radiator

I have recently completed finishing my unfinished attic (almost). The attic had plaster walls and a wood floor installed, which seemed to me that they builder had intentions of finishing it. The house was built in 1850. There are also two pipes for a radiator run into the attic (cut through a shaped plank for that radiator to sit on). I want to start looking for a salvaged radiator but I want to make sure that I get the correct size. The pipes are about 43" apart. Most of the radiators that I see online are measured in height, not width. Any help in selecting a radiator would be greatl appreciated.
Thanks, Tom
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To get the correct size, you need to know how much heat you need. Here is a good place to start http://www.colonialsupply.com/resources/radiator.htm
As long as the radiator fits between the pipes it is easy enough to plumb. If it does not, it can still be plumbed, just takes more time and elbows.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Greetings,
Ed's advice is good but in your case the right size may in fact the be wrong size. If your house has oversized radiators everywhere else due to added insulation, new windows, etc. and you put the "right size" radiator in one room that room may prove to be too cold. Consider oversizing your radiator by the same amount your other radiators have been oversized for consistent house heating.
Hope this helps, William
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Thanks guys...Is there an easy way to check and make sure that there are no leaks in the salvaged radiator?
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TomD wrote:

a) Bring a cap/plug to screw into one side of the radiator. b) Bring an air tank connected to a shutoff valve connected to a pressure valve to screw into the other side of the radiator. c) Open the valve to pressurize the radiator (don't overpressurize). d) Close the valve and use the pressure guage to see if the radiator holds.
.....
or ask for a 48 hour return period in case of leak.
Hope this helps, William
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You can also put the radiator in a pool and pressurize it and look for bubbles. Heavy to handle though.
You can also fill it with water and then pressurize it and look for leaks.
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