Adding a 2-wire receptacle with 12/2 wire

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I have a house with 2-wire receptacles. From one of the 2-wire receptacles, I want to run a line to a new 2-wire receptacle that I am adding. The wire I have to run the line is 12/2.
The question I have is, "What do I do with the bare ground wire in the 12/2 wire?"
The original 2-wire receptacle box and the new 2-wire receptacle box are metal. I am assuming that I should NOT connect the bare ground wire to the metal box on either end.
Is that correct, or am I supposed to attach the bare ground wire to each metal receptacle box even though I don't know if either box is grounded?
Thanks.
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what kind of line do you have BX 2 wire romex, K&T?
if its BX and good ground you can connect the ground to the box and begin upgrading to all grounded outlets
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what kind of line do you have BX 2 wire romex, K&T?
if its BX and good ground you can connect the ground to the box and begin upgrading to all grounded outlets ----------------------
It is 2-wire (black and white) -- in a single non-metallic sheath. I don't know if that is called BX or whatever.
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BETA-33 wrote:

No, that's Romex (trade name, but what they hey, it's what it's called).
If it's 12/2 w/no g, then the boxes aren't grounded (there's no ground to ground them with) so it really doesn't matter too much what you do w/ the new ground wire--it won't be grounded to anything, either.
But, it won't hurt anything (nor help anything, either, of course) to connect the ground wire to the metal boxes at each end. Then, if you do go back and add the ground back to the panel, that's done for the new one.
--
--

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Use a pigtail socket and bulb to test if the box is grounded, by touching the wires of the socket between the hot, black wire and the box. Some early NM cable had an undersized ground wire that was not connected to the box via grounding screw, but wrapped around the cable and clamped by the romex connector or pressure clamp

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if the OP has k&T things will get interesting here..........
Is the main fuses r circuit breakers?
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if the OP has k&T things will get interesting here..........
Is the main fuses r circuit breakers?
You must have gotten knocked on the head with K&T as a child. The OP already said what he has and it ain't K&T
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RBM wrote:

What is a "pigtail socket and bulb"?
-- John
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A lamp socket with two leads attached
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RBM wrote:

.
. http://www.hardwareworld.com/124-Pigtail-Socket-p10KB8E.aspx
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bud-- wrote:

That page says it's rated 660W and 240V. I assume the 660 is a typo for 60? But what about 240V, would that work for a regular household outlet?
Also, in another thread, you mentioned the plug in testers were not reliable for indicating the quality of the ground. What wattage bulb should I use to be clear I have a quality ground? And, if I understand, I put one wire in the receptacle's hot slot and the other in the ground slot for this? Can that trip the breaker?
-- John
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Don't worry about the wattage and voltage rating of the socket. Use a 100 watt lamp and touch one lead to the hot slot of the receptacle and the other to the metal box. If you get a good light, you got ground
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RBM wrote:

Not trying to really get on your nerves :)
I just want to clarify I am not the one with the metal boxes. I want to do this without opening up the outlet. It seems like you are describing touching the outlet screw and then the metal box. I want to put the wire in the hot hole and the ground hole (i.e. like plugging in something).
That picture didn't really show the wire ends, but I assumed they were just bare wire, which I would think would be hard to insert in outlet holes. But then you said the "leads" so maybe I misunderstood the way it is made. Is there some sort of metal "end" connected to the wires? I just picture a thin wire not making contact easily or maybe even arcing in a big hole. Thanks.
-- John
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RBM wrote:

OK, so it's not made as a "tester", you're just using it for that purpose?
It seems, though, that would be difficult to handle, since one hand would have to hold the bulb part without burning yourself, and then you have to manipulate 2 wires with one hand. Is there a tip you have for using it?
-- John
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The entire process will take about a second. The lamp won't have time to heat
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om...
use a regular lamp with 100 watt bulb. plug lamp into a cheap extension cord, cut off plug of extension cord. install insulated alligator clips.
when you done put the lamp back to its normal home
put your cheater extension cord in tool bin for next time its needed:)
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BETA-33 wrote:

Check to see if the original metal box is grounded. The cheap little plug in testers will do the job. Depending on the age of the house you might have the early romex with ground and the metal boxes are grounded, but ungrounded receptacles were used. If that's the case you can convert to grounded receptacles with relative ease.
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I'll do that.

I am not looking to convert to grounded outlets right now. For now, I just want to add one receptacle. It can be a 2-wire like all of the rest of the receptacles as far as I am concerned, but that leaves me with the question of what to do with the bare wire in the 12/2.
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re: that leaves me with the question of what to do with the bare wire in the 12/2
Well, the *easy* answer is to simply attach it to each metal box. If the circuit is grounded, your new recetacle will be grounded. If it isn't, no harm, no foul.
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My apologies for this suggestion. I stand corrected.
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