add junction box to stud after drywall is up?

Most junction boxes are meant to be installed on the stud before drywall is put up. Once the drywall is up, these junction boxes cannot be installed without cutting a large hole in the drywall.
Is there a way to mount junction boxes on the stud after drywall is put up without cutting a hole on the drywall larger than the switch plate?
There are some junction boxes that clamps on to drywall for support. I don't like this type. I prefer stud mount.
I want to add a light and light switch to a closet.
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I've done it, you can use an extra long driver bit and a couple of dry-wall screws & secure it very well. The only problem is that; you are screwing in at a pretty steep angle and the box will suck back as you tighten. With a little practice you can anticipate how much and start it protruding by that much.
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Run a couple of screws through the side of the box and into the stud.
Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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If you can't run a screw through the side of the box with the tools you have you can drive a rooffing nail or cc box nail through the side by holding a flatbar against the nail and striking it with a hammer. With a helper you can lean a piece of angle iron against the wall and squeeze the nails through the side of the box with channel lock pliers one jaw on the nail the other on the angle iron. peter wrote:
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If you are sure you want to put in a remodel box, and have it attached ot the stud, then you might want to check out the one box from Arlington Industries.
http://www.urlbee.com?8547
I'ver seen electricians cut holes and screw the boxes directly to the stud. Remember to have a sensitive knuckle, or a stud finder.
Good luck.
tom
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the old work metal boxes with expanding sides when you tighten a screw work great and i use them all the time, have never had a problem.
they have a advantage, you can remoe the box easily if you want to change something.
most of my use has been with plaster walls perhaps chincey soft drywall doesnt hold up as well?
when your home was built in 1950 electrical upgrades are the norm
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The current style Carlon old work boxes with the auto-swing out ears work superbly to mount directly on the drywall. But you want to mount to a stud, so
Here is a link to a Carlon model that nails to the front of the stud.
http://www.carlon.com/scripts/emAlbum.cgi?cmd=show_image&path=Zip%20Box%20Blue % 20Outlet%20and%20Switch%20Boxes&img &tn=1
They also make it in one piece plastic and you would just need a fairly small cutout to get the bracket onto the stud, perhaps a large switch cover would hide it if you don't want to do the small drywall repair.
But with this adjustable model, I *think* you can remove the bracket, slide it through the hole and onto the stud (flatten the nailing ears on the bracket), nail it through the drywall, then slide the box into the grooves.
-- Dennis
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peter posted for all of us...

CAUTION: Closet lights are restricted as to type and for good reason. Clothing or other objects come in contact and start fires - so pay attention.
--
Tekkie "There\'s no such thing as a tool I don\'t need."

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